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Coming wrapped in gorgeous low-slung styling, Ferraris are as much rolling works of art as they are automobiles. Unfortunately, they're also priced like museum-grade artwork, with even the cheapest model cracking the $200,000 mark. And that’s before adding options, which are astronomically expensive. Buyers can customize their cars in any number of ways to suit their tastes, from colors and hide treatments to racing and track options and styling details that include a plethora of carbon fiber appointments.

Though the brand’s exceedingly affluent buyers are hardly price-sensitive, the rest of us who are forced to stare from behind the velvet ropes would like to know what it takes to drive a Maranello-made model off the lot, you know, just in case. To that end, we did some digging and compiled pricing for Ferrari’s current lineup, noting base MSRPs and, were we able to find them, a sampling of option prices, which are quite steep in their own regard.

If you're in the market for one, check out justRED.com, the Internet's only online marketplace devoted exclusively to Ferraris. Those who love the lifestyle can immerse themselves even more with duPont Registry, where the Scuderia is celebrated both in print and digital.

Ferrari Roma: $222,620

Ferrari Roma
  • Engine: Twin-turbo 3.9-liter V8
  • Power: 612 HP / 561 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 3.1 sec (est.)

The stunning Roma is a four-passenger grand touring coupe that’s said to be engineered with enough refinement and comfort to be used as a daily driver. It’s gracefully styled in the tradition of Ferraris from the 1950s and ‘60s, with a sharp nose and graceful curves running front to rear. Packing a 612-horsepower, twin-turbocharged 3.9-liter V8 and an eight-speed dual-clutch transmission, the Roma can sprint to 60 miles per hour in under 3.5 seconds.

This is technically Ferrari’s “entry level” model, costing a few thousand dollars less to start than the Portofino M. That said, you can choose from among a large assortment of options – wheels, colors, breaks, interior upholstery, etc. – that will drive the price up accordingly.

Check out every Ferrari Roma on sale at justRED.com.

Ferrari Portofino M: $226,000

Ferrari Portofino M
  • Engine: Twin-turbo 3.9-liter V8
  • Power: 612 HP / 561 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 3.4 sec (est.)

Named for a fishing village on the Italian Riviera, the picturesque Portofino M is Ferrari’s other “entry level" mode with a starting price in the low $200K-rangel. Coming with a retractable hardtop for four-season fun, the pert Portofino M packs a 612-horsepower, twin-turbocharged 3.9-liter V8 engine that enables a jump to 60 mph in just 3.4 seconds. As a grand touring car, the Portofino M is more graceful than brutal. What’s the M stand for? We don’t know, but the Portofino picked it up in 2021 when Ferrari gave the car more power.

The usual suspects appear on the options list, but Ferrari no longer lists their individual prices in its official configurator. The last time we checked, though, if you want your car painted in a “Ferrari historical color,” you’ll pay around $12,500, while the available Magneride dual-mode suspension cost nearly $5,600. A fire extinguisher cost over $1,000, and if you smoke, you’ll have to pay upwards of $800 for what amounts to an ashtray and lighter.

Check out every Ferrari Portofino M on sale at justRED.com.

Ferrari F8 Tributo: $270,530

Ferrari F8 Tribute
  • Engine: Twin-turbo 3.9-liter V8
  • Power: 710 HP / 568 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.8 sec (est.)

The F8 Tributo is a gracefully cast two-seat coupe with an abundance of exterior curves and slashes that beg a closer look from every angle. It comes powered by a mid-mounted, twin-turbocharged, 3.9-liter V8 engine that channels a healthy 710 horsepower through the rear wheels via a seven-speed automatic transmission. With a throaty exhaust note, it can sprint from 0-60 seconds in a hair under three seconds.

As with other Ferrari models, the F8 Tributo can be customized to the max with an extensive selection of exterior colors and upholstery options. Based on the last time Ferrari listed prices for its options, a carbon fiber engine cover cost just shy of $8,000 and titanium exhaust pipes were around $2,500. You can also get the rev counter in either of five colors, pick between five different seating choices, and even specify titanium wheel bolts.

Check out every Ferrari F8 Tributo on sale at justRED.com.

Ferrari F8 Spider: $297,250

Ferrari F8 Spider, the road test
  • Engine: Twin-turbo 3.9-liter V8
  • Power: 710 HP / 568 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.9 sec (est.)

As the name implies, the F8 Spider is the open-air alternative to the closed-roof F8 Tributo. Also wrapped in eye-catching styling, it features a power retractable hard top.

When it launched, the F8 Spider was positioned as being “less extreme” than the 488 Pista Spider and sportier than the 488 Spider it replaced. It likewise comes powered by a mid-mounted, 710-horsepower, twin-turbo V8 with a seven-speed automatic driving the rear wheels.

Option choices here are similar to the F8 Tributo, except that you can choose a black retractable top instead of a body-color roof.

Check out every Ferrari F8 Spider on sale at justRED.com.

Ferrari 296 GTB: $321,000 (est.)

Ferrari 296 GTB
  • Engine: Twin-turbo 3.0-liter V6 PHEV
  • Power: 818 HP / 546 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.9 sec (est.)

Introduced just last summer, the 296 GTB is the only car in Ferrari’s entire lineup with a V6 engine. In this case, it’s a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 that’s paired with a plug-in hybrid powertrain. Together they produce a mighty 818 hp and 546 ft-lb of torque, enabling a 0-60 time of just 2.9 seconds. It even offers 16 miles of pure electric driving range.

The 296 GTB’s base price is estimated to be around $321,000, which makes it the best bang for the buck from Maranello in terms of horsepower per dollar. It also previews something about the upcoming Purosangue SUV, which will likely use the same unique V6 engine.

Ferrari 812 GTS: $404,494

2020 Ferrari 812 GTS
  • Engine: 6.5-liter V12
  • Power: 789 HP / 530 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.8 sec (est.)

The open-air 812 GTS is still on sale despite Ferrari dropping the 812 Superfast from its lineup in favor of the more racing-oriented 812 Competizione and equally open-top Competizione A. The grand tourer is still drop-dead gorgeous and can hit the 60 mph mark in just 2.8 ticks.

As with the 812 coupe, the GTS can be finished in an amazingly extensive choice of exterior colors, wheel designs, and interior leather treatments, along with high-cost add-ons like carbon fiber racing seats.

Check out every Ferrari 812 Superfast on sale at justRED.com.

Ferrari SF90 Stradale: $507,300

Ferrari SF90 Stradale
  • Engine: Twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 PHEV
  • Power: 986 HP / 590 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: AWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.3 sec (est.)

The SF90 Stradale is Ferrari’s first production plug-in hybrid sports car, and it’s a two-seater with an equally rare all-wheel-drive setup. It’s powered by a twin-turbocharged, 4.0-liter V8 engine assisted by three electric motors (two in front and another at the rear). The combination enables the SF90 Stradale to boast the highest power output of any V8-equipped Ferrari to date, at an uncanny 986 horsepower.

Equipped with an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission, it’s said to reach 60 mph in around 2.5 seconds. It’s electric only range is a mere 15.5 miles, so don’t expect to breeze past the gas pumps (it’s rated at 18 mpg in combined city/highway driving). It’s also one good-looking coupe, with no shortage of exterior styling excess.

While we don’t have information on option prices, add-ons include the usual assortment of painted brake calipers, wheel choices, interior colors, seat treatments, and a choice of titanium or black ceramic exhaust pipes.

Check out every Ferrari SF90 Stradale on sale at justRED.com.

Ferrari SF90 Spider: $570,000 (est.)

Ferrari SF90 Spider
  • Engine: Twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 PHEV
  • Power: 986 HP / 590 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: AWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.3 sec (est.)

If you’re too tall to fit in the closed-roof SF90 Stradale, perhaps the drop-top SF90 Spider would fit you better. Following Ferrari’s familiar nomenclature, the Spider indicates this is the convertible version of the brand’s most powerful road car. With an estimated starting price of $570,000, it’s significantly more expensive than its sibling, but aural access to that twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 doesn’t come cheap.

Ferrari 812 Competizione: $601,570

Ferrari 812 Competizione A
  • Engine: 6.5-liter V12
  • Power: 819 HP / 510 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.6 sec (est.)

With the demise of the 812 Superfast came the rise of the 812 Competizione, a much more hardcore version of the former with a decidely racing-oriented bent. Ferrari increased the front-engined V12 coupe’s power by 30 to 819 rip-roarin’ horsepower, though torque has fallen 19 lb-ft. It’s new redline, however, is 9,500 RPM, making it the highest revving Ferrari road car ever made.

Of course, the starting price of the Competizione model is much higher than the Superfast it replaces, but Ferrari did a lot of work lowering the car’s weight and increasing mid-range performance. While its top speed and 0-60 time are virtually identical to the Superfast, the Competizione pulls much harder thanks to a lower power-to-weight ratio.

Ferrari 812 Competizione A: $672,500

Ferrari 812 Competizione A
  • Engine: 6.5-liter V12
  • Power: 819 HP / 510 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.6 sec (est.)

With every coupe comes a Spider in Ferrari Land. Accompanying the new 812 Competizione is its convertible version, the 812 Competizione A, which stands for Aptera. As per usual, adding the A costs about $70,000 more than the tin-top model. It’s also a smidge slower thanks to the increased weight associated with opening a car up to the heavens.

Ferrari Monza SP1/SP2: $1,750,000

Ferrari Monza SP1 And SP2
  • Engine: 6.5-liter V12
  • Power: 799 HP / 530 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.7 sec (est.)

The frighteningly expensive Ferrari Monza SP1 and SP2 models are open-top speedsters with a postmodern profile reminiscent of Ferraris from motoring’s post-war age. There’s no windshield, rather a “virtual windshield” that channels air around the cabin. This is said to enable uncluttered forward visibility and approaches that of a Formula One car.

They’re the first in a series of limited production “Icona” (icon, in English) models, with either model’s 499-unit output long ago spoken for among Ferrari’s most-loyal (and richest) customers. The SP1 is a one-seater, with a solid panel where the passenger’s seat in the two-passenger SP2 otherwise resides. A 799-horsepower 6.5-liter V12 engine sits under a front-hinged one-piece carbon fiber hood and enables a 0-60 mph run in just under three seconds. The rumored price of these special models ranges from $1,750,000 to $2,300,000 new, and probably much higher on the auction circuit.

Ferrari Daytona SP3: $2,300,000

Daytona_SP3_01
  • Engine: 6.5-liter V12
  • Power: 828 HP / 514 LB-FT
  • Drivetrain: RWD
  • 0-60 MPH: 2.6 sec (est.)

The newest Ferrari model is the achingly cool Daytona SP3, which is the third model in the brand’s special Icona series. With a price tag of $2,300,000 and all 599 examples already sold, it’s the most expensive and exclusive Ferrari you could buy right now… if you could buy one.

While the Daytona SP3’s design is stunning, it’s also aero efficient being the slipperiest body the prancing horse has ever produced. The car uses the same naturally aspirated 6.5-liter V12 engine from the 812 Competizione, though it’s mounted amidships and produces a bit more power thanks to redesigned parts.

FAQ

Can I even buy a Ferrari?

Sure you can. There are many Ferrari dealers in the US, particularly in high net worth metropolises like New York City, Miami, and Los Angeles. It may be the case that you can't buy a brand new Ferrari directly from the manufacturer, though, as there's likely a wait list for every model currently on sale. That said, you can buy used Ferraris at places like justRED.com and duPont Registry.

What is the cheapest Ferrari?

Currently, the least expensive Ferrari to buy new is the Roma, with a starting price of $222,620. Though for less than $4,000 more, you could have the Portofino M, which is a hard-top convertible. Those prices are without any options, which, let's face it, is not how the car will be ordered, so expect to pay considerably more once it's been personalized.

What's the most expensive Ferrari?

The Ferrari Daytona SP3 is currently the most expensive car from Modena, with a price tag reportedly around $2,300,000. The Daytona SP3 is part of Ferrari's special Icona series and follows the similarly expensive Monza SP1 and SP2 models. Ferrari is only building 599 examples of each car, and they're all already spoken for.

Do I have to own a Ferrari to buy a Ferrari?

In some cases, Ferrari has offered its cars first to people who have bought many of its cars in the past. The more Ferraris you buy, the higher up you are on that list and more likely you are to have an opportunity to buy the next car that comes out. Also, people who buy multiple Ferraris usually have a good relationship with their dealership because they're a guaranteed sale. All of this makes it less likely someone could walk in off the street and buy their first Ferrari without waiting a very long time for delivery.

Gallery: Ferrari Lineup Pricing

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