The Mercedes-AMG GT is a Symphony of Destruction: First Drive

Where do I start with Mercedes’ AMG division? For the most part, it's filled with a bunch of German death metal and black magic engineers. Given this undeniable fact (Google it), things that come out of the Affalterbach factory often tend to be too much for even the devil himself to handle.

For years, AMG vehicles have been looked at as big hammers for small nails. Grossly overpowered, untamable beasts that would eat tires at an alarming rate of speed. Sort of like what Jeremy Clarkson found out when he tested the last generation C63 in Spain. But then Mercedes and AMG went about building something less shouty and more refined. 

German Muscle No More

The Mercedes-AMG GT is a Symphony of Destruction: First Drive

Instead of going after the German muscle car crowd, AMG threw away years of muscle car engineering and squared off with the Porsche 911. No longer naturally aspirated, no longer the massive 6.2-liter V8, no longer the big, brash and flashy cars of old— the AMG GT is a new beast. Unlike AMG cars of yore, the GT is refined and composed. You could drive from Munich to Monaco, flog around the Formula 1 track, and then drive back to Munich without so much as a hiccup. It’s the perfect culmination of both a GT car and a sports car— somehow the AMG engineers found a way to not hamper either of those characteristics in one vehicle. 

The Mercedes-AMG GT is a Symphony of Destruction: First Drive

With that mix of refinement and handling comes a third selling point: handling. The Michelin Pilot Super Sports are super sticky, and when you move the steering a quarter of an inch in any direction, the G...