These models might not be the top dogs in their respective ranges, but they are still quite quick.

All-wheel drive lets a vehicle maximize its traction by using both axles for putting the power down to the road. For an example of how this setup can help a model perform, check out this video of a Mercedes-AMG GT S doing a quarter-mile drag race against a Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS.

The Mercedes-AMG GT S comes to this race with more power. Its 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 pumps out 515 horsepower (384 kilowatts) and 494 pound-feet (670 Newton-meters). However, the seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox sends the power exclusively to the rear wheels. 

The Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS is from the 991 generation because there isn't a GTS trim yet for the 992 gen. Its 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-six engine makes 444 hp (331 kW) and 405 lb-ft (550 Nm) of torque. The model also has a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission, but the output goes to both axles.

Mercedes-AMG GT S and Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS are both intermediate performance steps in their respective lineups. They aren't the absolute base models, but buyers with more cash to spend can opt for even quicker versions. With one of these vehicles covering the quarter-mile in a brisk 10.9 seconds, an owner is still getting quite a performance vehicle without paying for the range-topper.

Both of these models have replacements on the way, too. Spy shots already provide a glimpse of the new 911 GTS, but powertrain details about it aren't yet available. The output is likely higher than the Carrera S' 443 hp (330 kW), though.

There are no images of the next-gen AMG GT yet, but the company already confirms that it would move to an all-wheel-drive layout. The division also intends for all models arriving after 2021 to use some form of electrification.

Source: Talking Torque via YouTube