With an estimated price of $325,000, the Ford Mustang GTD is the most expensive Mustang in its 60-year history. That price tag isn't dissuading interested parties from stepping up to get one. Ford announced it's received over 7,500 applications during the 37 days it was open for the United States and Canada. Now, it's Europe's turn—in more ways than one.

Applications open across the pond in June, coinciding with the car's European debut at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Ford also revealed an official timed lap of the Nürburgring will happen at some point in the fourth quarter of this year. The company is aiming for a sub-seven-minute time. If that happens, the car will supplant the Dodge Viper ACR as the quickest American production car on the infamous Nordschleife loop. But there's still testing to be done between now and then.

Gallery: 2025 Ford Mustang GTD

“We've tested the Mustang GTD in North America extensively, including laps at Sebring International Raceway and Virginia International Raceway," said Greg Goodall, chief program engineer for the Mustang GTD. "This has all been in service of engineering a car that can lap the Nurburgring in under seven minutes. Moving onto European roads and dedicated test sessions at the Nürburgring is the next step, ahead of a timed run later this year."

It's worth noting the 7,500-plus applications far exceed Ford's plan for GTD production. The company lists a production range of 300 to 700 units per year in the GTD application, and for now, it's only being built for 2025 and 2026. Basic math tells us that's 600 to 1,400 cars for over 7,500 buyers, and the application process hasn't even begun yet in Europe. There will be more applicants to come from Mexico and the Middle East, too.

Who's lining up to buy a $325,000 Mustang? According to Ford, there are strong ties to the motorsports realm. Around 20 percent of applicants have a connection to racing in some form or another, but curiously, only one in four already owns a Mustang.

With over 800 horsepower, a GT3-derived suspension, and a rear-mounted transmission for a near 50/50 weight distribution, there's never been another Mustang like the GTD. It'll be interesting to see how many applications are ultimately received, and whether Ford alters production plans to accommodate high demand.

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