The global all-electric convertible segment is pretty deserted these days. The MG Cyberster seems like a very decent product but it will go on sale in the United Kingdom and other European countries in the summer of next year. There’s also the Mini Cooper SE Convertible EV but the automaker will produce just 999 examples of the EV and all of them will find new homes on the Old Continent. If you live in China, however, there’s another option and it is actually the most affordable zero-emissions cabriolet money can buy today.

Let’s start with some background first, though. Wuling is a Chinese automaker that builds and sells the Mini EV, which was the third-best-selling electric vehicle on the planet last year. With a total of 443,400 deliveries last year, it almost outsold the Tesla Model 3. We’ve discussed this vehicle before with the launch of the GameBoy special edition model, which our friends at Wheelsboy got the chance to review. Now, our Chinese pals are at it again but this time around, they have new content with the open-top version of the car.

Gallery: Wuling Mini EV Cabrio

The video at the top of this page and the gallery above – shared exclusively with the Motor1.com audience – depict what is currently the cheapest electric convertible in the world. Unfortunately, it is sold only in China where it kicks off at around $14,000 with the current exchange rates. For comparison, in the United States, the most affordable convertible is the Mazda MX-5 Miata, which starts at a little below $30,000.

Not much has changed in the design department compared to the previous version of the mini electric car. It still has those weird proportions and rides on the same 12-inch wheels. It is a truly small vehicle measuring 3,059 millimeters (120.4 inches) in length, 1,521 mm (59.9 in) in width, 1,614 mm (63.5 in) in height, and 2,010 mm (79.1 in) between the axles. One big difference compared to the other Wuling Mini EVs is that this one seats just two and has a very strange cargo compartment that cannot be accessed from the outside of the car.

But this is just one of the car’s many weird characteristics. We’ll name a few more before letting you dive into this forbidden fruit through the video at the top of this page. Take for example the fact that you need an actual key to start the electric car. Also, don’t forget about the archaic radio on the center console, which still has Bluetooth connectivity and three USB ports. 

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