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The new F-150 Lightning is an exciting offering for truck customers who want the practicality of a full-sized truck without the fuel consumption. Ford’s best-selling F-150 has entered the electric range with the new F-150 Lightning leading Ford’s charge towards an electric future.

Although the F-150 Lightning is a new dawn for the full-sized American truck, that doesn’t mean passionate owners will stop modifying their trucks. The team at Town and Country Ford decided to see just how much range is lost if you decide to install a leveling kit and bigger wheel and tires to your new F-150 Lightning.

It's no secret that lifting your truck harms fuel economy due to an increase in drag. Truck engineers spend a great deal of time creating practical vehicles that are as aerodynamic as possible striking a balance between efficiency and capability. For the F-150 Lightning, the range is a critical factor for customers who want to go as long as possible between charging stations.

In stock form, the F-150 Lightning used by Town and Country Ford for this video has a range of 230 miles. After installing the leveling kit and large wheels and tire range dropped by about 20% to only 186 miles. This loss of 44 miles of range in the name of the style is a sacrifice truck owners will need to consider before modifying their new EVs.

Leveling the F-150 Lightning was a simple process. Like current gasoline-powered trucks, the front strut was removed and a puck spacer was installed on top of the strut. This simple modification helps raise the front of the F-150 Lightning by about 2.0-inches which gives the truck more presence and a lifted look without a huge amount of work.

The rear suspension of the F-150 Lightning is unique to this truck and will require an engineered solution before a lift kit is ready for consumer use. The independent rear suspension setup is unique to the F-150 Lightning, which uses a rear-mounted electric motor to drive the rear wheels.

Would you level your F-150 Lightning at the cost of 20% range or keep the suspension stock?

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