That would be 20- to 25-percent more at the crank, mind you.

Last month, a report from Car and Driver came out saying that the Toyota Supra has more power than what was announced by the company. The claim was from a dyno testing that reported 339 horsepower (253 kiloWatts) and 427 pound-feet (579 Newton-meter) of torque at the wheels. It was hard to fathom the results at that time. The good thing is, the automotive website has released the actual video of the dyno testing just recently to substantiate the claim.

Watch the video above to see the actual dyno testing. Don't forget to lower the volume first as the editing's a bit weird.

After seeing the video, the results are indeed true – 339 hp and 427 lb-ft at the wheels. In contrast to what Toyota declared, the Supra is supposed to make 335 hp (250 kW) and 365 lb-ft (495 Nm) at the crank. Considering the drivetrain losses in the transmission and the rear axle, the result should be 20 to 25 percent lower than the crank ratings, at worst.

But, they weren't. The result was even bigger, with the torque rating going way above the declared numbers. Thinking backward, the crank rating should be 25 percent higher than the wheel output, so the actual output numbers could be around 400 hp (298 kW) and 500 lb-ft (678 Nm) torque – but that would be an assumption at this point.

Is the Supra engine really a detuned version of what's inside the BMW Z4? We don't know but we're happy to think otherwise. Whether Toyota did underrate the Supra on paper or not, that would be beyond us. There could be many reasons why there's a discrepancy between the spec sheet numbers and the actual dyno test, but if the assumption is true, it would be a lie from Toyota we'll be glad to hear about.

Source: Car and Driver via Youtube