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Verdict

9.3 / 10

Design | Comfort | Tech | Performance | Safety | Fuel Economy | Pricing | FAQ

Modern technology and improved safety standards have basically made it impossible to replicate the simplicity and feel that sports cars from the '80s, '90s, and earlier provided. But the 2022 BMW M240i – while still heavy-ish and technology-filled – does a good enough job of keeping that classic sports car spirit alive.

By channeling the brand's past while also embracing the future, the new 2er delivers agility and personality, just like some of your favorite BMW models of yore, while still offering advanced active safety equipment, standard all-wheel drive, and a modern gearbox. It's no E46, but the M240i reminds us why those classic BMWs were so beloved in the first place.

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Quick Specs 2022 BMW M240i Coupe
Engine Turbocharged 3.0-Liter I6
Output 300 Horsepower / 311 Pound-Feet
Efficiency 22 City / 28 Highway / 24 Combined
Base Price $41,500 + $1,095
As-Tested Price $51,320

Gallery: 2022 BMW M240i: Reivew

Design

7/10
  • Exterior Color: Mineral White 
  • Interior Color: Tacora Red
  • Wheel Size: 19 Inches

From the side, the M240i's short rear deck, subtle lip spoiler, and 19-inch wheels give it nearly perfect proportions. The only thing keeping the 2er from achieving that "golden ratio" is its elongated schnozz; there's too much front overhang.

And when you get a glimpse of the M240i dead on, it's even tougher to look at. Sure, the headlights are sharp and the kidneys are normal-sized compared to the M3 and M4, but the detailing on the lower portion of the bumper is all out of whack. The triangular vents on each corner cut through the otherwise smooth, cohesive design like a hot knife. The central vent beneath those kidneys suffers the same issue, plus it's surrounded by crinkled sheet metal that creases upward toward the hood line with no specific endpoint.

This tester sports the optional Shadowline treatment ($400), which swaps the traditional matte silver accents for gloss black instead, with Mineral White paint ($550). But if you're paying extra, it's worth splurging on BMW's new Thundernight Metallic purple ($550), which is one of the prettiest hues you can buy on any car today. Beyond that, those 19-inch wheels give the M240i a phenomenal footprint, and the back end is much cleaner than the front, with a unique taillight design, a bulky black diffuser, and sharp styling cues.

Even if you don't like the exterior design, at least it looks unique. The M240i's borrowed interior components, meanwhile, are disappointing. All the same elements from its big siblings trickle down, minus one or two 2-specific cues, like triangular stitching on the door panels and an LED lighting signature with M colors. A bevy of soft black plastic lines the dash and door panels, a piano black shifter sits dead center, and a Tacora Red leather covers the seats. It all looks nice and feels luxurious, at least, but it's a carbon copy of other BMW interiors.

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Comfort

7/10
  • Seating Capacity: 5 
  • Seating Configuration: 2 / 3
  • Cargo Capacity: 10.2 Cubic Feet

The good news here is that the BMW 2 Series has a back seat at all, unlike the comparable Porsche 718 Cayman or Toyota Supra. That said, the rear of the BMW 2 Series is not where you want to be. The bench is extremely tight – actually, tighter than it was in the previous model – while attempting to jump in the second row is a mission unto itself. The passenger side gets an electronically sliding front seat, but even still, the opening is tight and access is difficult.

From either of the two front buckets, though, the 2 Series never feels too cramped. Headroom is plentiful and best-in-class, as is legroom, and as with nearly all BMW cabin designs, there's nothing too bulky in the center console to impinge on elbow room. The chairs themselves are great, with perfect amounts of bolstering and plenty of cushiness to support your butt and back over long distances. Adding the $2,750 Premium package tacks on heated front seats and a heated steering wheel.

  Headroom, Front/Rear Legroom, Front/Rear Cargo Space
Audi TT 37.1 / 33.8 41.1 / 28.9 12.0 Cubic Feet
BMW M240i 39.8 / 35.0 41.8 / 32.2 10.0 Cubic Feet
Toyota Supra 38.3 42.2 10.2 Cubic Feet

Even with 19-inch wheels, the M420i is surprisingly cushy on-road. The suspension is smooth and soft in Comfort and Eco Pro drive modes, absorbing imperfections well. Sport mode stiffens up the suspension, but not to unusable levels as in some other BMW M products. On top of that, there's barely any road noise that enters that cabin – just a light burble from the engine that most owners will enjoy, anyways.

Technology & Connectivity

8/10
  • Center Display: 10.3-Inch Touchscreen 
  • Instrument Cluster Display: 12.3-Inch Productivity Screen
  • Wireless Apple CarPlay or Android Auto: Yes

The standard screen on the M240i is a 10.3-inch central display with adjacent analog gauges. Opting for the $2,750 Premium package, as equipped on our tester, adds the Live Cockpit Pro and its 12.3-inch digital cluster, among other features like navigation and a head-up display.

The user interface here is still iDrive 7, as opposed to the newer iDrive 8 found in products like the BMW iX. The new system is much improved over iDrive 7, but this setup still works well enough. The home screen layout is clean and easy to use, minus some digging for certain settings, and the rotary dial in the center console makes it simple to navigate while on the move. Wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are two other big pluses with this system.

The bad news is that you do have to pay for some of these features, like the aforementioned digital instrument cluster and baked-in navigation. And unless you opt for this specific trim, the M240i, the standard touchscreen in the 2 Series is an 8.8-inch display.

Performance & Handling

8/10
  • Engine: Turbocharged 3.0-Liter Inline-Six 
  • Combined Output: 382 Horsepower / 369 Pound-Feet
  • Transmission: Eight-Speed Automatic

Base 2 Series models make do with a turbocharged four-cylinder engine and standard rear-wheel drive – which, as Clint Simone found out, is a perfect formula for fun. But the M240i beefs up with a turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six good for 382 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque, paired to a ZF eight-speed automatic and standard all-wheel drive. Not even the base model gets a manual, sadly.

But the M240i's immense power makes up for the lack of a row-your-own shifter. This mid-range M model is only 20 hp down on the old M2 Competition and gets to 60 nearly as quickly, managing it in 4.1 seconds. And this car is legit bonkers off the line, launching with little turbo lag and maintaining a flat torque curve that allows for max twist at under 2,000 RPM.

The eight-speed automatic is quick, ripping off shifts comparable to a dual-clutch and smartly downshifting in Sport and Sport Plus modes without forcing the driver to flick the paddles. BMW's excellent xDrive all-wheel-drive system and those sticky summer tires assure this car ample grip as well, both off the line when using launch control and in the corners.

And it's in the twisties where the M240i really comes into its own. The suspension tuning makes this 2er feel lively and composed, with body movements that are exceptionally well-composed. BMW M models have a knack for cornering quickly, but the M240i seemingly does it better than some of its siblings.

The steering, though, is a little lightweight for my liking and lacks some feedback. That issue is common in most modern BMW products, but at least the tiller is accurate and quick, which makes the M240i easy to fling around with ferocity. And when you're done, the standard M Sport brakes provide ample stopping power – although they can be a touch grabby when puttering around town.

Safety

7/10
  • Driver Assistance Level: SAE Level 2 (Hands-On) 
  • NHTSA Rating: Not Tested
  • IIHS Rating: Top Safety Pick Plus

Every BMW 2 Series gets a standard forward-collision warning with automatic emergency braking, a lane-departure warning with lane-keep assist, and front and rear parking sensors. Adaptive cruise control is optional on the M240i as part of the $1,450 Driving Assistance package, among other things, like a 360-degree camera and the remote parking assistant.

The extra cost for the Driving Assistance package is worth it. Even with a small car like the 2 Series, having an overhead camera makes parking that much easier. And the adaptive cruise control here, as it is on most other BMW products, offers a nearly hands-free experience on the highway.

Fuel Economy

7/10
  • City: 23 MPG 
  • Highway: 32 MPG
  • Combined: 26 MPG

In spite of being a six-cylinder, the BMW M240i has the more fuel-efficient engines in the segment, returning 23 miles per gallon city, 32 highway, and 26 combined. The turbo four in the Audi TT is just a smidge behind the Bimmer on the highway, returning 31 mpg, but it matches the 2 Series with a combined 26 mpg. The six-cylinder Supra 3.0 gets just 25 combined, and even the Cayman with a flat-four still only returns 24 combined. And as with most options in the class, the M240i’s six-cylinder engine does require premium fuel, which makes it slightly pricier at the pump.

Toyota’s four-cylinder Supra 2.0 is still the most efficient option in the segment, with that version of the sports car yielding a combined 28 mpg. But for context, this Supra is more than 100 horses down on the M240i and doesn’t compete directly with this version of the 2 Series. So you can get a more efficient Supra, but it isn’t nearly as quick.

  City Highway Combined
Audi TT 23 31 26
BMW M240i 23 32 26
Porsche 718 Cayman 21 27 24
Toyota Supra 2.0 25 32 28
Toyota Supra 3.0 22 30 25

Pricing

8/10
  • Base Price: $36,350 + $995 Destination 
  • Trim Base Price: $49,545
  • As-Tested Price: $57,295

For 2022, the base BMW 2 Series costs $37,345 with the $995 destination fee included. That's cheaper than a four-cylinder Supra ($44,315) and way more affordable than the most affordable Cayman ($61,850). The M240i asks at least $49,545, which still makes it an inexpensive option compared to the alternatives.

This tester, with most of the available bells and whistles equipped, costs $57,295. And when taken at face value, sure, that does sound like a lot for such a small car. But the M240i justifies that figure with features like the $2,750 Premium package, the $1,450 Driving Assistance package, and the $1,450 Vernasca Read leather interior. Even with all of those options equipped, the M240i is still more affordable than a comparable Cayman or TT.

  Base Price
Audi TT $51,595
BMW M240i $49,545
Porsche 718 Cayman $61,850
Toyota Supra 2.0 $44,315
Toyota Supra 3.0 $55,985

And that price tag is definitely a plus, considering what little else is available at that cost. But even without looking at the MSRP, five minutes behind the wheel of this car will tell you everything to know. The BMW M240i is exceptionally charming, personable, and fun to fling around. Add the necessary equipment, like an active driving suite and better tech, and it’s hard not to fall in love with this little car.

Competitor Reviews:

FAQS 


How Fast Is The BMW M240i?

The BMW M240i is powered by a turbocharged 3.0-liter inline-six engine that produces 382 horsepower and 369 pound-feet. That propels the coupe to 60 miles per hour in 4.1 seconds and on to a limited top speed of 155 miles per hour.


Is The BMW M240i Faster Than An M2?

According to the official 60 times provided by BMW, the outgoing M2 Competition will hit 60 miles per hour in just 4.0 seconds, while the new M240i gets there in 4.1 seconds.


Where Is The 2022 BMW 2 Series Made?

BMW produces the new 2 Series at its facility in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. It is the company’s newest factory and will continue producing new models going forward.


2022 BMW M240i Coupe

Engine Turbocharged 3.0-liter I6
Output 382 Horsepower / 369 Pound-Feet
Transmission Eight-Speed Automatic
Drive Type All-Wheel Drive
Speed 0-60 MPH 4.1 Seconds
Maximum speed 155 Miles Per Hour
Efficiency 23 City / 32 Highway / 26 Combined
Weight 3,871 Pounds
Seating Capacity 4
Cargo Volume 10.0 Cubic Feet
Base Price $36,350 + $995 Destination
Trim Base Price $49,545
As-Tested Price $57,295
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