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It’s soothing to watch master woodcarvers create something unique from nature. They carve, whittle, and trim the wood into delicate shapes and stunning finished pieces. The latest creation from the ND - Woodworking Art YouTube channel qualifies for that distinction as it’s more than a toy model of the Mercedes-Benz Vision AVTR concept. It’s a birthday present that moves under its own power.

The video chronicles the 100-day build that begins by showing the chassis assembly. The frame is welded together before the suspension is attached, which includes 14-inch wheels and real tires. The front suspension even features shocks, indicating the detail this dad is going to for his son’s birthday present.

Gallery: Mercedes-Benz Vision AVTR Concept

The car slowly comes together piece by piece, with rough chunks of wood loosely defining the car’s shape. A chainsaw helps slice it down as the wooden car begins to resemble the real-life concept. There’s an exquisite level of detail throughout the vehicle, which even features the concept’s functioning light-up bionic flaps at the back. But, of course, that’s not all.

The wooden car also features automatically opening doors, and a copious amount of LEDs inside and out that recreate the real car’s lighting signature. The toy even features LED wheel covers, just like the concept car from 2020. It’s a faithful replica of the stunning concept in wood form.

Mercedes took inspiration for its autonomous concept from the original Avatar film. The movie influenced the car’s design and the technology that went into it, like the graphene-based organic battery cell chemistry. The concept also emphasized autonomy, omitting a steering wheel, which the wooden toy also lacks. The automaker revealed the concept at CES in 2020.

The video concludes with the father picking his son up from school in the finished wooden replica, which should become a cherished gift. The video is another reminder that car culture extends far beyond the makes and models rolling off automakers’ assembly lines. This is one way to introduce a new generation to cars.

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