By 1992 standards, the automatic climate control and power vents are pretty high-tech features.

The Toyota Crown occupies a role in the brand's Japanese line as a kind of blend between the Avalon and Lexus GS. In comparison to most Japanese traffic, it's a fairly big sedan and capable of carrying four adults in comfort. However, the Crown lacks the high-end luxury features of the Toyota Celsior, known to most of the rest of the world as the Lexus LS. Now, an extremely nice 1992 Crown with just 12,990 kilometers (8,072 miles) on the odometer is coming to the United States courtesy of Pacific Coast Auto.

This one features boxy styling that quickly evokes the look of the first-gen Lexus LS but with slightly rounder proportions. Under the hood, there's a 2.5-liter inline-six from Toyota's 1JZ family of engines, and an automatic gearbox sends the power to the rear wheels. These sedans have a comfort-oriented suspension setup that fits well with the smooth powerplant. 

The interior is where this Crown really gets weird. The top portions of the front and rear seats have lace doilies covering them. There's even one for the center armrest in the back. They immediately give the cabin the feel of an elderly woman's living room, like the accents on your grandmother's furniture. The white trim especially adds a visual pop over the gray upholstery.

By 1992 standards, the cabin has a few other neat features, like automatic climate control that Toyota proclaims uses a microprocessor to control it. There are also separate controls for the rear air conditioning, and power front vents that can swing toward the driver at the touch of a button.

The Crown appears to be in generally good condition other than some scratches on the body and failed shocks for holding up the hood. We would have a difficult time figuring out what to do with such a nice sedan. This Toyota looks like too much of a survivor to modify into a VIP-style machine with big wheels and a ground-scraping air suspension. Conversely, it might be a little too boring to driving stock.

Source: Pacific Coast Auto via YouTube