No EV sports car, too.

Mazda remains committed to internal combustion engines and might offer its new 3 hatchback and sedan in an all-wheel drive plus manual gearbox configuration. Unfortunately, the good news doesn’t mean the Japanese company is open to resurrecting the MPS badge for the newly-launched model.

When asked by Australian media about a potential hot hatch based on the new Mazda3, the automaker's new global boss, Akira Marumoto, said that "Mazda is a small player” and that the hot hatch niche segment has a low priority for the company. Therefore, “we are not planning for MPS in the future."

Rather than expanding into new segments, Mazda wants to establish itself as a premium alternative to the established European brands. That should come through improved overall quality and better comfort and refinement of the models from the brand’s existing lineup.

We’re also sad to report Mazda has no plans to launch a new generation rotary-powered sports car, which basically means the stunning RX Vision Concept from 2015 (pictured just below) will remain just a design study. Mazda has already confirmed a rotary engine will be used as a generator in one of the marque’s future electric vehicles, but there won’t be a rotary-powered two-door sports car.

"The RX Vision is a vision model for design development so we didn't plan for production or commercialization of this model," Marumoto commented. "I am receiving this question maybe 100 times, and I will not commit. That is a dream for all the Mazda executives and employees and it is my job to make employees dream come true. Nothing has been decided."

In another revelation, Marumoto confirmed Mazda is not interested in building an all-electric sports car. "I don't want to make such a car, I prefer the smell of gasoline," he added and we can’t agree more.

Source: Drive

Gallery: 2019 Mazda3