The boxing champion paid $4.8 million to buy the only U.S.-spec car ever made, did the new owner have to spend that much?

UPDATE: Sold! Mayweather may have paid $4.8M for this car back in the day, but it found a new owner Saturday afternoon at Monterey, crossing the block at Mecum Auctions for a cool $2.6M.

Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Rolls-Royces, Veyrons – you name it. Floyd Mayweather has or had them all. A couple of years ago he bought something even more exotic, this super rare 2010 Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita of which only two were ever made. This is the single example built for the United States and has covered a mere 1,947 miles (3,133 kilometers), so no wonder it’s in great condition inside and out.

 

 

 

Koenigsegg originally wanted to make three of them, but the intricate and sparkling “Diamond Weave” carbon fiber body proved to be quite tricky to produce and as a consequence the third car never saw the light of day. It boasts a double carbon fiber rear wing as well as a detachable hardtop that can be stored in the front trunk when not in use to turn the CCXR into a roadster.

At its heart is a 4.8-liter V8 all-aluminum engine featuring a pair of superchargers delivering a whopping 1,018 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 796 pound-feet (1,080 Newton-meters) of torque to the 20-inch forged aluminum rear wheels through a bespoke six-speed transverse gearbox and a limited-slip differential. Without any fluids in it, the CCXR tips the scales at just 2,821 pounds (1,280 kilograms).

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With so much power in such a light body, it goes without saying the performances are pretty amazing: 0-62 mph (0-100 kph) takes 2.9 seconds while 0-124 mph (0-200 kph) is achieved in 8.7 seconds en route to a top speed of more than 250 mph (400 kph). Its carbon ceramic brakes for both front and rear axles ensure the hypercar necessitates only 13 seconds for the 0-200-0 kph task and 25.5 seconds to complete the 0-300-0 kph journey.

Mecum Auctions will have the ex-Mayweather CCXR up for grabs during the Monterey sale (August 16-19) without estimating how much it will fetch. Considering how rare these cars are and the fact that it has barely been used, this Trevita (Swedish abbreviation that means “three whites") could very well turn out to be one of the most expensive Koenigseggs ever sold at an auction.

Source: Mecum Auctions

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