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The first-generation Ford GT was a relative bargain when it was new. Sold from 2005 to 2006, the MSRP was around $150,000 and the Heritage edition package wasn't a significant add-on. In 2022, however, these cars are a bit more valuable. That makes this collision all the more painful, though fortunately, the injuries appear to only be financial in nature.

Shared to social media by John Peddie on Facebook, it's impossible to miss the iconic blue/orange Gulf livery that denotes the Ford GT Heritage model. It's also impossible to miss the extensive damage on the nose, the result of an alleged impact with a palm tree according to Road & Track. Images certainly show a tree-sized impact on the passenger side of the front fascia, wrinkling the hood and basically destroying the entire nose.

 

The Facebook post doesn't provide context, but Road & Track states the driver was in fact the owner of the car. Moreover, it seems the 50-year-old Boca Raton resident recently purchased the GT for $704,000, and was taking it for a spin when he lost control after a downshift. According to the report, the driver told police he was unfamiliar with driving a stick shift car. He crashed into the tree while leaving his housing development, then got a ride with a security guard back to his house where he called the police. But wait, there's more.

Apparently, the person didn't have the Ford registered yet. Worse yet, the car wasn't insured either. And to put an extra cherry on top of this cake, the report states the owner didn't have a driver's license. Apparently, it had been suspended, leading police to cite the man for driving on a suspended license. As for operating a car without insurance or registration, he was reportedly given a warning.

Ford built a total of 4,038 GTs in 2005 and 2006, the only two years of production for the first-generation supercar. Of those, just 346 received the Heritage treatment. Photos show extensive damage to the front of the car, but the extent of damage underneath – and whether or not it's repairable – is unknown.

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