If you’re paying off a car loan, you may be interested in gap insurance coverage.

 

 

Imagine this scenario: You take out an auto loan to buy a new car, only to get in an accident that leaves your car totaled a year or two later. If you didn’t spring for guaranteed asset protection, or “gap” insurance, you’d end up owing money on a car you can no longer drive. 

In this article, we’ll take a look at how gap insurance works, explain when it may be a good investment, and give our recommendations for the best car insurance companies that offer gap coverage.

If you’re shopping for car insurance and want to find the best rates, you can use the tool below to get free and quick quotes from top providers.

 

In this article:

How Does Gap Insurance Work?

Gap insurance covers the difference between the value of a car when it's totaled or stolen and what is owed on a car loan. It kicks in when you fill out a total loss claim and is usually considered an add-on feature you purchase in addition to liability coverage and collision or comprehensive car insurance.

In the event of a total loss, an insurer will reimburse your car’s actual cash value, or ACV. If the remaining balance on an existing car loan is greater than the ACV, gap coverage covers the remaining amount. 

Here’s an example: You’re financing a vehicle and have an outstanding loan balance of $12,000. You’re involved in a collision and the car is declared a total loss. Since you have collision insurance, the auto insurer determines the value of your car to be $9,000, minus your deductible, and writes you a check for that amount. A gap insurance policy will cover the $3,000 left on your loan amount.  

 


 

When Should You Get Gap Insurance?

If you’re not leasing or financing a vehicle, then you likely don’t need gap coverage. If you are financing a vehicle, gap insurance coverage could be worth the investment depending on how much you drive, how much you owe, and the stability of your car’s value. 

Here are a few situations in which you should or should not consider getting gap insurance:

You Should Consider Gap Insurance If... You Should Skip Gap Insurance If...
You’re leasing a car for more than 48 months You purchased your car outright
Your car has a fast depreciation rate Your car depreciates slowly

You drive many miles per year,

leading to quicker depreciation

You don’t drive too much,

keeping your car’s value higher for longer

You made a low or $0 down payment on a car loan

You made a large down payment

and will pay off your loan quickly

 

It’s worth noting the value of a car can depreciate quickly. The Insurance Information Institute (III) estimates most vehicles lose 20 percent of their value within a year. This means the balance on a car loan can eventually outpace the value of your car, especially if you choose not to make a large down payment. 

When financing a car, your dealership will typically give you the chance to buy gap coverage on the spot. Depending on your standard car insurance provider, you may also be able to add gap coverage to your full coverage auto insurance policy. However, this typically must be done while your vehicle is less than three model years old. 

So, is gap insurance worth the money? Here are a few steps to take to decide:

  1. Use a tool like Kelley Blue Book to estimate the value of your car. You’ll want to check your car’s value for each year of ownership until your auto loan is paid off.
  2. Calculate your remaining monthly payments after each year of ownership, and compare them against your car’s estimated value at the time. 
  3. Add up how much you will pay in gap coverage until you pay off your loan, and determine whether it’s less than you would have to pay out of pocket to cover your car loan if you didn’t have gap coverage.

 


 

What’s The Cost Of Gap Insurance?

Rates for gap coverage vary widely depending on whether you purchase through a dealership or your standard insurer. If you buy a policy through an auto insurance company, you can expect to see a few dollars more on your monthly payment – usually between $20 and $60 per year. 

The cost of optional coverage like a gap coverage will depend on the value of your car. Keep in mind that some insurers won’t allow you to purchase gap coverage unless you have full coverage auto insurance, which includes comprehensive and collision coverage as well as your state’s required liability insurance. 

While it’s generally cheap through an insurer, buying gap insurance from a lender or dealership could cost you hundreds of dollars. According to nonprofit consumer group United Policyholders, a lender could charge between $500 and $700. Financing a car and purchasing gap insurance through a credit union could be cheaper, but rolling the cost of coverage into your loan means you’ll be paying interest on it. 

 


 

Alternatives To Gap Coverage

While gap insurance is one way to protect your finances in the event of a total loss, there are some other options you may come across as well, including new car replacement coverage and loan/lease payoff.

New Car Replacement 

This type of policy is best for drivers who are more focused on getting their car replaced rather than paying it off. In a total loss situation, new car replacement insurance will help you pay for a replacement vehicle that’s the same make and model as your totaled car. Typically, you’ll have to pay a deductible before your coverage kicks in.

Keep in mind that new car replacement insurance is usually only offered for newer cars with low mileage, and some insurers may only offer this instead of gap insurance.

Loan/Lease Payoff 

Some insurers use the terms loan/lease payoff and gap insurance interchangeably, but there are a few differences between the two types of policies.

Gap insurance is generally reserved for new vehicles, but loan/lease payoff coverage may be an avenue for used cars. This type of policy works by paying a determined percentage of your car’s value – generally 25 percent of the ACV. 

So, for example, if the value of your vehicle is $12,000, loan/lease payoff coverage would cover $3,000. There is typically a deductible with loan/lease payoff insurance, but check with your insurance provider to make sure. 

 


 

Our Recommendations For Car Insurance

Since the cost of gap insurance policies can differ by insurance provider, we recommend you look at multiple companies to compare quotes before making a financial commitment. Our team of insurance specialists has researched every major auto policy provider in the United States and found that USAA and Progressive are two great options. Learn more about them below, or to get free quotes from these insurers, enter your zip code here:

 

USAA: Best For Military

USAA Insurance logo

USAA is an excellent option due to its competitive rates and money-saving opportunities like family, loyalty, and new vehicle discounts. We rate the company 5.0 out of 5.0 stars and aren’t the only ones to applaud its customer service – USAA also earned an A- rating from the Better Business Bureau (BBB).

The only catch with USAA is that in order to join, you must be a member of the military or have an immediate family member with a USAA membership. 

USAA offers both gap insurance and vehicle replacement assistance. You can learn more in our full USAA auto insurance review.

Progressive: Best For High-Risk Drivers

Progressive Insurance logo

Progressive is another great option that offers multiple discounts for policy owners, including those for practicing safe driving habits and bundling home and auto insurance policies. With an A+ rating from the BBB, it’s known for having solid customer service.

One of the main reasons we like Progressive is that it offers low rates for high-risk drivers. So if you’re under 25, over 65, or have a DUI/DWI on your driving record, this may be a good place to start shopping for cheap car insurance.

The insurer has both gap coverage and loan/lease payoff options, with the latter costing only $5 per month on average. Read our comprehensive Progressive auto insurance review for more information.

 


 

FAQ: Gap Insurance

Is gap insurance worth the money?

Picking up gap insurance can be a good investment if you made a small down payment on a vehicle, have a loan term over 48 months, or your car quickly depreciates in value.

What does gap insurance mean?

Gap insurance is a form of optional coverage that may assist drivers in covering the difference between what they owe on a loan and the actual cash value of a car if it is totaled or stolen. “Gap” actually stands for “guaranteed asset protection.”

Do I need gap insurance if I have full coverage?

Full coverage insurance typically includes liability, collision, and comprehensive coverage. Gap insurance can be purchased separately. Depending on your lender, you may be required to get gap insurance if you have full coverage and still have a remaining balance on an auto lease or loan.

How does gap insurance work if your car is totaled?

If your car is totaled, gap insurance will cover the difference between your car’s actual value and the money you still owe on a car loan.