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Best All-Terrain Tires

We tested the best all-terrain tires for handling in wet, dry, dirt, and gravel terrain, as well as their overall comfort.
Written By:
Aidan Pounder
Written By: Aidan Pounder Writer – Motor1 Review Team

Aidan Pounder is a Motor1 product tester who has written reviews spanning from tonneau covers to rooftop cargo boxes. If he’s not burning through the clutch on his 2003 Ford Focus Zx3, you’ll find him keeping up with the latest happenings in the world of European football.

Tested By:
Jonathan Benson
Tested By: Jonathan Benson Founder of TyreReviews.com

Jonathan Benson is an independent tire tester for Motor1.com with more than 15 years of experience in the tire industry. He founded TyreReviews.com / Tire-Reviews.com in 2006, establishing the largest-reaching dedicated tire review source in the world.

Last Updated 01/08/2024

Motor1 Reviews Team Take:

  • The best all-terrain tires on the 2024 market are from top tire companies including Continental, BFGoodrich, Firestone, Goodyear, Pirelli, Yokohama, Toyo, and Nitto.
  • On average, you can expect to spend around $160 and upward of $175 per tire for a high-quality all-terrain replacement tire.
  • When buying a new set of all-terrain tires, you want to consider how well they handle uneven terrain including dirt and gravel as well as wet and dry roads for everyday use.
Best All-Terrain Tire
Continental Terrain Contact A/T

On- or off-road, it’s hard to beat the performance of this all-terrain tire.

Best
All-Terrain Tires
For Snow
BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A

An all-terrain tire that doesn’t struggle for grip in wintery conditions.

Best Budget
All-Terrain Tires
Firestone Destination A/T2

A high-quality all-terrain tire that will last and won’t break the bank.

Best
All-Terrain Highway Tire
Goodyear Wrangler

A fantastic all-terrain tire for those concerned about towing heavy loads.

Best Tires
for Light Trucks
Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus

A top-of-the-line all-terrain tire that’s specifically made for light trucks.

Original equipment manufacturers (OEM) and car makers rarely put all-terrain tires on new vehicles, as most drivers just want all-around performance. However, the best all-terrain tires can improve your pickup truck, crossover, or SUV’s performance both on- and off-road. Don’t rely on all-season tires when all-terrain tires are designed for switching from on-road to off-road driving.

To truly find the best of the best, we’ve extensively tested each all-terrain tire (AT) featured in this article. We highlight options for a variety of budgets and even include a few three-peak mountain snowflakes (3PMSF) rated tires for those worried about snow traction.


All-Terrain Tires Reviews

close up of all terrain tire

For this review, our independent tester tested and evaluated each all-terrain tire based on dry handling, wet handling, dirt handling, gravel handling, and overall comfort. The scores in each category are compiled into a cumulative rating ranging from 1.0 to 10.0.

What Is The Best All Terrain Tire?

We named the Continental Terrain Contact A/T, BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A, Firestone Destination A/T2, Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar, Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus, Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015, Toyo Open Country A/T III, and the Nitto Grappler G2 as the best-rated all-terrain tires on the market in 2024.

Brand/ModelApproximate Cost
(per tire)
Overall Rating
(Out of 10.0 Stars)
Award
Continental
Terrain Contact A/T
$2009.0Best All-Terrain Tire
BFGoodrich
Trail Terrain T/A
$1709.0Best All-Terrain Tires for Snow
Firestone
Destination A/T2
$1609.0Best Budget All-Terrain Tires
Goodyear
Wrangler
$1808.9Best All-Terrain Highway Tire
Pirelli
Scorpion All Terrain Plus
$2008.9Best Tires for Light Trucks
Yokohama
Geolandar A/T G015
$1508.8Best Riding All-Terrain Tire
Toyo
Open Country A/T III
$1608.8Best Aggressive All-Terrain Tires
Nitto
Terra Grappler G2
$1908.3Best All-Terrain Tire for Daily Driving

*Because cost data fluctuates, the prices in the table above are approximate values that our team regularly updates.

All Terrian Tires Ratings: Our Testing Process

The all-terrain tires in this article went through two rounds of reviews. We started by searching retailers like Tire Rack and Discount Tire for top products, looking at factors such as tread patterns, siping, customer ratings, and prices.

Our independent tire tester, Jonathan Benson of TyreReviews.com, ordered tires from all the top brands on the market. He is internationally renowned for performing some of the most involved and thorough testing in the industry.

Benson predominantly tested each all-terrain tire on a 2014 Ford Raptor, and a Ford F-150 was used for braking and aquaplaning tests. Testing took place at Continental’s Uvalde Proving Grounds in Texas.

Learn more about how we tested all-terrain tires here.

1. Continental Terrain Contact A/T: Best All-Terrain Tire

Continental Terrain Contact A/T
  • Cost: Starts around $200
  • 3PMSF: No
  • Treadwear: 680
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

Continental Terrain Contact A/T Review

The Continental Terrain Contact A/T is designed for unbeatable performance on the road and in light off-road conditions, making it our choice for the Best All-Terrain Tire on the market in 2024. 

You can see how the Continental Terrain Contact A/T performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling9.0
Dry Handling9.0
Dirt Handling9.0
Gravel Handling9.0
Comfort9.0
Overall Rating9.0

An aggressive tread pattern paired with a full-depth sipe design ensures you’re well-equipped for slippery on-road conditions as well as rough terrain.

Continental Terrain Contact A/T: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the Continental Terrain Contact A/T:

Pros Top-of-the-line dirt handling Good steering response on wet roads Minimal road noise
Cons Turns slowly on gravel

Continental Terrain Contact A/T: Our Experience

Overall, we found that the Continental Terrain Contact A/T is a very easy tire to drive. It offers good steering response, good peak grip, and the tire’s progressive past the limit. It also produces minimal road noise at 60.0 mph.

In terms of dirt handling, the Terrain Contact A/T was the most impressive tire in this specific testing category. It was incredibly easy to drive and offered optimal performance in every direction. To quote our independent tester, Jonathan Benson, the Continental Terrain Contact A/T is “unreal” in dirt.

In terms of gravel handling, the Continental felt okay at the limit – but somewhat fidgety below the limit at approximately 35.0 mph. In general, this all-terrain tire took a while to turn and the rear wheels moved around a little when on gravel.

Continental Terrain Contact A/T Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 6 years/60,000 miles (half mileage for rear if different size than front)
  • Uniformity: 1 year/first 2/32 inch of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 6 years/free replacement first year or 2/32 in. of wear, then prorate until 2/32 in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: 1 year/first 2/32 in. of wear

2. BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A: Best All-Terrain Tires For Snow

  • Cost: Starts around $170
  • 3PMSF: Yes
  • Treadwear: 660
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

BFGoodrich Trail Terrain Review

Specially developed for drivers of crossovers and SUVs, the BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A provides traction in wet, dry, and snowy conditions. The tire’s advanced tread compound is resistant to chipping and tearing, while an optimized footprint promotes even treadwear and limits road noise.

You can see how the BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A performed in each category below: 

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling8.5
Dry Handling8.8
Dirt Handling9.3
Gravel Handling10.0
Comfort8.5
Overall Rating9.0

The tire’s internal construction consists of a two-ply polyester casing to maintain a higher level of reliability during off-road use.

BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A:

Pros Best overall grip of all of the all-terrain tires we tested Comparable to the Continental’s dirt handling Instills confidence on gravel
Cons Less comfortable on bumpy roads

BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A: Our Experience

In our experience, the BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A had very similar controllability to our choice for the Best All-Terrain Tire in 2024, the Continental Terrain Contact A/T. Compared to the Continental, it reacted better when braking and had more grip everywhere that we tested. It also was significantly better both at the limit and sublimit. However, higher speeds meant the rear would swing out from time to time – but overall this is a fantastic tire.

The balance of this tire was superb, though there was a lot of understeer causing somewhat of a lack of grip in all directions. However, the Trail Terrain T/A did offer good general steering and what understeer there was, was safe and predictable. Additionally, noise levels were similar to that of other all-terrain tires – though we preferred the slightly lower tone of this tire.

It should be noted that impacts over bumps were somewhat harsh and were felt in the cabin.

BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A: Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 6 years/60,000 miles (half mileage for rear if different size than front)
  • Uniformity: 1 year/first 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 6 years/free replacement first year or 2/32 in. or 25 percent of wear, then prorate until 2/32 in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: None

3. Firestone Destination A/T2: Best Budget All-Terrain Tires

  • Cost: Starts around $160
  • 3PMSF: Yes
  • Treadwear: 540
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

Firestone Destination AT2 Review

The Firestone Destination A/T2 is designed for drivers who want a tire they can depend on, on- or off-road. A featured symmetric tread design blends off-road capabilities with minimal noise level. 

You can see how the Firestone Destination A/T2 performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling8.8
Dry Handling8.8
Dirt Handling8.8
Gravel Handling9.8
Comfort9.0
Overall Rating9.0

This tire also features Firestone’s HydroGrip Technology, which limits the likelihood of hydroplaning and improves overall handling in wet weather conditions.

Firestone Destination A/T2: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the Firestone Destination A/T2:

Pros Incredibly quiet on highways Excellent wet braking Good grip in the dirt
Cons Noticeable road noise when turning

Firestone Destination A/T2: Our Experience

The Firestone Destination A/T2, on the whole, is a quality all-terrain tire. Steering was eager, though our independent tester did notice some bounceback when straightening up coming out of turns. We found this tire was a little harder to control past the limit, albeit offering good grip. 

The Destination A/T2’s gravel handling wandered more than the BFGoodrich, but it performed better than the Continental in this test. Our independent tester also noted that this tire was excellent when wet braking, as it offered significant road traction, although he did note he felt a lot of understeer in the balance with low feedback.

It should be mentioned that this was the quietest all-terrain tire that we tested in a straight line, but the Firestone’s tread blocks produced noticeable pattern noise when turning – more than others.

Firestone Destination A/T2: Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 5 years/55,000 miles (half mileage for rear if different size than front)
  • Uniformity: First 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 5 years/free replacement first 3 years, then prorate until 2/32 in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: None

4. Goodyear Wrangler: Best All-Terrain Highway Tire

  • Cost: Starts around $180
  • 3PMSF: Yes
  • Treadwear: 640
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar Review

The Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar combines on-road competence with off-road capabilities. Offered in standard load sizes for 0.5-ton vehicles, the All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar is also available in pro-grade load range E sizes for 0.75- and 1.0-ton vehicles that are regularly towing heavy loads.

You can see how the Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure with Kevlar performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling9.0
Dry Handling9.3
Dirt Handling8.8
Gravel Handling9.3
Comfort8.3
Overall Rating8.9

These Goodyear tires have a good treadwear score to give you peace of mind when driving in poor weather. These tires are especially good if you drive on gravel or uneven surfaces regularly.

Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar:

Pros Good grip on wet roads Consistent traction in the dirt Direct steering on dry roads
Cons Generally less comfortable than other all-terrain tires

Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Tires: Our Experience

Overall, the Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure with Kevlar was a nice tire to drive. It offered well-rounded grip in wet conditions, and its general steering and balance were comparable to that of Continental’s all-terrain tire featured in this review. 

It offered good grip in dirt, and our independent tire tester found performance to be quite similar to the Firestone Destination A/T2. On gravel, the best compliment we can give Goodyear’s all-terrain tire is that, again, it was quite similar to the Continental Terrain Contact A/T. Handling was less precise below the limit in comparison to the Terrain Contact A/T, but the All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar performed better on the gravel at the limit.

In terms of road noise, the Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar wasn’t the noisiest tire we tested, but it was quite noticeable while turning. If comfort is king in your world, we don’t recommend Goodyear’s all-terrain tire. It was significantly less comfortable than other tires we tested and impacts were almost jarring in the cabin.

Goodyear Wrangler Tires: Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 6 years/60,000 miles
  • Uniformity: 1 year/first 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 6 years/free replacement first year or 2/32 in. or 25 percent of wear, then prorated until 2/32 in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: None

5. Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus: Best Tires For Light Trucks

  • Cost: Starts around $200
  • 3PMSF: Yes
  • Treadwear: 640
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus Review

The Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus is a light truck (LT) tire designed for drivers looking for an all-terrain tire that balances on-road performance with off-road capabilities. Pirelli’s cut- and chip-resistant New Generation tread compound minimizes the likelihood of a flat tire while the high-void tread pattern itself provides an abundance of traction off-road.

You can see how the Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling9.0
Dry Handling9.0
Dirt Handling8.8
Gravel Handling9.0
Comfort8.5
Overall Rating8.9

This tire offers good steering control and the high treadwear score helps to ensure that you’ll be safe using these tires on wet roads and poor weather conditions if you live in an area that experiences colder or unpredictable weather conditions.

Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus:

Pros Comparable dirt handling to the Continental Good overall steering response on wet roads Feels well balanced on dry roads
Cons Less grip on wet roads than our top picks

Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus: Our Experience

In our tester’s experience, the Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus was a fun tire to drive on wet roads. It offered good steering and its balance was progressive, but our independent tire tester did note a little bit too much oversteer. Benson ultimately compares this tire to the Toyo all-terrain tire in the wet but notes that the Pirelli was much nicer to drive.

On dry roads, the Scorpion All Terrain Plus’s steering fell short of Goodyear’s, but it did outperform the Continental. Overall, the Pirelli was well-balanced, and Benson didn’t notice any oversteer when changing lanes. On the track, he felt the Scorpion All Terrain Plus was fun to drive, well-balanced, and ultimately had a hint of oversteer if you were looking for it.

In the dirt, the Pirelli performed quite similarly to the Continental. It handled well and was equally well-balanced. On gravel roads, our independent tire tester notes that tread pattern isn’t everything. He notes this tire was similar to the Continental in terms of overall gravel handling, but with the Pirelli, the rear end of our test vehicle wasn’t quite as loose below the limits of the tire’s grip.

In regard to the Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus’s overall comfort, there were mixed feelings. The tire felt firm, yet still well-damped, meaning there were no secondary impacts felt in the cabin of our test vehicle. Subjectively, Benson felt this all-terrain tire wasn’t as rough as tires that aren’t as firm, and overall road noise was just okay.

Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus: Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 6 years/50,000 miles (half mileage for rear if different size than front)
  • Uniformity: 1 year/first 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 6 years/free replacement first year or 2/32 in. of wear, then prorated until 2/32 in. of remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: N/A

6. Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015: Best Riding All-Terrain Tire

  • Cost: Starts around $150
  • 3PMSF: Yes
  • Treadwear: 600
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015 Review

The Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015’s internal tire construction consists of dual high-tensile steel belts resting on a two-ply polyester cord casing and a spirally wrapped nylon reinforcement. This ultimately stabilizes the Yokohama all-terrain tire and adds to its ride comfort.

You can see how the Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015 performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling8.5
Dry Handling8.8
Dirt Handling8.5
Gravel Handling9.0
Comfort9.3
Overall Rating8.8

A triple polymer tread compound is molded into an aggressive tread design for improved wear, while deep circumferential grooves allow for fluid water evacuation.

Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015:

Pros Very good wet braking Good general grip on wet roads Reasonable grip on gravel
Cons Our tester had issues braking in dirt

Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015: Our Experience

In terms of wet handling, the Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015 offered good grip and great traction, as well as nearly optimal performance when Benson hit the brakes. However, this all-terrain tire did offer less feedback at the limit than the Continental and required more attentive steering. It also was more prone to understeering early when compared to other all-terrain tires. Ultimately, it’s a good tire, but not as drivable as the Continental.

For dry handling, the Yokohama didn’t oversteer when changing lanes, but it did offer sluggish steering. The grip was reasonable when braking and the tire felt well balanced, but steering was a tad imprecise and the Geolandar A/T G015 felt a little weaker laterally than some of the other all-terrain tires we tested.

In dirt, our independent tire tester felt that braking was a big issue. The front end of our test vehicle felt like it was prone to wandering more than other all-terrain tires, but overall performance still wasn’t bad by any means. For gravel handling, we felt it handled reasonably well sub-limit, but Benson noted difficulty controlling the tire at its limit. Overall grip in gravel was reasonable, but it felt like it was hard-earned.

Overall comfort was incredible. This tire also offered the least amount of road noise of any all-terrain tire that we tested. By some distance, our team believes this is the most comfortable all-terrain tire on the market in 2024.

*It’s worth noting that our independent tire tester felt he had an off lap in terms of his personal driving performance in one lap around the dirt track. Additionally, there was an issue with timing on another lap – so data was limited for this tire’s performance in dirt handling tests.

Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015: Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 5 years/60,000 miles (Euro/P-metric sizes), 5 years/50,000 miles (LT-metric/Flotation sizes), with half mileage for rear if different size than front
  • Uniformity: First 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 5 years/free replacement first year or 2/32 in. of wear, then prorated to 2/32 in. of remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: N/A

7. Toyo Open Country A/T III: Best Aggressive All-Terrain Tires

  • Cost: Starts around $160
  • 3PMSF: Yes
  • Treadwear: 600
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

Toyo Open Country A/T III Review

The Toyo Open Country A/T III utilizes a wet-traction-focused compound and 3D multi-wave sipes to optimize wet traction both on- and off-road. A symmetric tread pattern and increased block rigidity help this all-terrain tire’s dry handling, while still balancing that with quiet on-road performance.

You can see how the Toyo Open Country A/T III performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling8.0
Dry Handling8.8
Dirt Handling9.3
Gravel Handling10.0
Comfort7.8
Overall Rating8.8

 A large number of lateral grooves minimize the likelihood of hydroplaning. With a high treadwear score, this tire is built to last and endure rough conditions.

Toyo Open Country A/T III: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the Toyo Open Country A/T III:

Pros Very enjoyable to drive in the dirt Grippy and incredibly predictable in gravel Good grip on dry roads
Cons Prone to understeer on wet roads

Toyo Open Country A/T III: Our Experience

In our experience, the Toyo Open Country A/T III inspired mixed feelings from our team on wet roads. Below the limit, this all-terrain tire felt good. However, at the tire’s limit driving became difficult. Understeer was present in abundance, and one slight driver error cost a lot of time. Looking at the numbers, the tire performed surprisingly well, but its test results ultimately cost the Toyo points.

On dry roads, the Open Country A/T III wasn’t as direct as Benson thought it would be. Despite a slight delay in steering and some imprecision with our test vehicle’s front end, this tire was quite stable at the back and offered a good grip.

Our tire tester had a great time on dirt roads. Benson said the Toyo is a “very enjoyable tire to drive” due to a number of reasons. This tire offered lots of front-end bite, it was progressive past the limit, it was good on the brakes, and it was just downright fast.

If you ask us, the Toyo Open Country A/T III was up there with the BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A in terms of its predictability, controllability at the limit, and overall grip in the gravel. Below the limit, it just fell short of the BFGoodrich’s gravel performance, but there was little difference between the two. Even though Benson felt he made a few small driving errors during this specific test, it was still the fastest.

In terms of overall comfort, the Open Country A/T III didn’t wow us. If we had to compare this tire’s comfort to another all-terrain tire in this review, it was most similar to the Nitto. However, Benson did say that he felt this tire was quite noisy on the road.

Toyo Open Country A/T III: Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 5 years/65,000 miles (P-metric/metric sizes), 5 years/50,000 miles (LT sizes), with half mileage for rear if different size than front
  • Uniformity: First 1/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 5 years/free replacement first 25 percent of wear, then prorated to final 2/32 in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: N/A

8. Nitto Terra Grappler G2: Best All-Terrain Tire For Daily Driving

Nitto Terra Grappler G2
  • Cost: Starts around $190
  • 3PMSF: Yes
  • Treadwear: 600
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B

Nitto Terra Grappler G2 Review

The Nitto Terra Grappler G2 is designed to last without giving up any grip on or off the road. These off-road tires are meant to be installed on crossovers, Jeeps, SUVs, and pickup trucks.

You can see how the Nitto Terra Grappler G2 performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling7.0
Dry Handling9.0
Dirt Handling8.5
Gravel Handling9.0
Comfort8.0
Overall Rating8.3

Coupling joints are molded into the outermost tread elements to ensure off-road performance. Zig-zag circumferential grooves ensure traction in light snow. As with all Grappler tires, the G2 features two unique sidewall designs.

Nitto Terra Grappler G2: Pros And Cons

Below are the pros and cons of the Nitto Terra Grappler G2:

Pros Good grip in the dirt Felt controllable past the limit in gravel Quick, direct steering on dry roads
Cons General lack of grip on wet roads

Nitto Terra Grappler G2: Our Experience

The Nitto Terra Grappler G2 offered quick, direct steering and plenty of road grip when dry braking. Our independent tester noted that steering felt okay in wet conditions, but he struggled with finding grip. When tested for dirt handling, the Terra Grappler G2’s steering was encouraging but eventually began to pick up either over- or under-steer as the test went on. Peaky sliding at the rear and a lack of grip sub-limit means you’d likely be better off with mud-terrain tires for improved dirt handling.

We were disappointed with the Nitto’s performance in gravel. While it was controllable past the limit, it was by no means snappy in its response. The Nitto’s overall comfort matches that of most all-terrain tires, but it was noticeably noisier in a straight line and when turning left. Strangely enough, our independent tester noted it was relatively quiet when turning right and that it may be a clever design decision.

Nitto Terra Grappler G2: Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 5 years/65,000 miles (Euro and P-metric sizes), 5 years/50,000 miles (LT sizes), with half mileage for rear if different size than front
  • Uniformity: First 1/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 5 years/free replacement first 25 percent of wear, or then prorated until 2/32 in. of remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: None

All Terrain Tires Buying Guide

There are a huge number of all-terrain tires available online, and it can be difficult to determine which is the right fit for you. With this in mind, we highlight helpful information that relates to any type of tire while digging into what makes an all-terrain tire one of the best in its class.

What Are All-Terrain Tires?

All-terrain tires are a mix of highway tires (H/T) and mud tires. This type of tire is designed to provide traction on all different kinds of surfaces, including on- and off-road. All-terrain tires allow drivers to commute to work and take their family down gravel backroads, without needing to swap and switch their tires.

All-terrain tires are used on cars, SUVs, trucks, and crossovers. When asked about utilizing all-terrain tires on one of these types of vehicles, our independent tire expert, Jonathan Benson of TyreReviews.com, had this to say:

I’ve done some SUV testing. But SUV and truck [are] kind of a crossover segment anyway, because they’re both heavier vehicles. A lot of SUV owners like fitting an all-terrain tire. And when I say truck, I’m talking F-150, like [an everyday pick-up] truck.

Are All-Terrain Tires Worth It?

Our tire expert has a multitude of thoughts when it comes to the necessity of owning all-terrain tires. Here’s what Benson had to say when comparing all-terrain to other types of tires:

An F-150, out of factory, comes with an all-season tire. Then if you want to do some light off-roading, an all-season tire is probably fine, but if you want that kind of peace of mind, you want to move to an all-terrain tire. But then are you doing a lot of off-roading, do you want a mud all-terrain tire, or an aggressive all-terrain tire? Or, now there’s these RT tires – which are rugged terrain tires – which look more like a mud terrain tire, but act like an all-terrain tire.

All-Terrain Tires For Your Vehicle: What You Need To Know

No matter which all-terrain tire you want to purchase, it’s important to understand a tire’s Uniform Tire Quality Grading (UTQG) ratings. All tires sold in the U.S. feature these ratings, and they’re a great way to understand the base characteristics of the tire you’re about to purchase. You should also know how to read a tire’s sidewall and how to take care of your new all-terrain tires once you’ve got them on your vehicle.

UTQG Tire Ratings

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is the governing body that enforces federal safety standards for all tires sold in the United States. The NHTSA created the UTQG standards to allow customers to make more informed purchasing decisions. There are three different categories of UTQG ratings. These include:

  • Treadwear: This compares a tire’s tread against that of a control tire’s tread. A score of 100 indicates that the tested tire’s treads last as long as the control tire’s, 200 indicates that the tire lasts twice as long, and so on.
  • Traction: Graded on a scale of AA, A, B, and C, this rating is based on a tire’s braking g-force.
  • Temperature: Graded on a scale of A, B, or C, this tests a tire’s ability to withstand running at high speeds.

How To Read A Tire’s Sidewall

The many markings, letters, and numbers on a tire’s sidewall can make it tough to find information just by looking at the tire. Simply understanding the markings on a tire’s sidewall is a task in itself. Here is an explanation of the information you can find on a tire’s sidewall:

  • Tire size: The width of the tire, which is expressed in millimeters, is the first set of numbers on a tire’s sidewall.
  • Type of tire: Identify which type of tire you have by the letters included before the size of the tire. A tire that doesn’t have any letters or a tire with a “P” before the tire size is a passenger tire with a standard load (a four-ply rating).
  • Weight capacity: A tire that includes the letters “XL” after the size has a higher weight capacity than a standard load. However, an “XL” tire has less weight capacity than an “LT” tire (for light truck) or an “ST” tire (for special trailer).
  • Aspect ratio: The aspect ratio is the second set of numbers you will see on a tire’s sidewall. It’s a percentage that is calculated by dividing the tire’s height measured from the rim to the tread by the tire’s width.
  • Type of construction: Directly after the aspect ratio comes the tire’s type of construction. The most common type of tire will have an “R” for radial. “B” stands for bias, and “D” stands for diagonal. Plies are perpendicular to the tread in radial tires and overlap diagonally to the tread in bias and diagonal tires.
  • Rim diameter: Finally comes the rim diameter, which is expressed in inches.

Taking Care Of Your All-Terrain Tires

There’s no point in investing money in a new set of all-terrain tires if you don’t take care of them properly. Here are three steps to take to get the most out of all-terrain tires:

  1. Wheel alignment: Properly aligning your wheels can lead to longer tire lifespan. It can also help your tires wear more evenly.
  2. Tire rotation: Consider rotating your tires every 5,000 miles or as often as your automaker recommends to avoid uneven treadwear.
  3. Balance: It can be unsafe to operate a vehicle with wheels that aren’t properly balanced due to vibrations. You will get more out of your tires if you keep them balanced.

Compare All Terrain Tires

Brand/Model3PMSFTreadwearTractionTemperature
Continental
Terrain Contact A/T
No680.0AB
BFGoodrich
Trail Terrain T/A
Yes660.0AB
Firestone
Destination A/T2
Yes540.0AB
Goodyear
Wrangler
Yes640.0AB
Pirelli
Scorpion All Terrain Plus
Yes640.0AB
Yokohama
Geolandar A/T G015
Yes600.0AB
Toyo
Open Country A/T III
Yes600.0AB
Nitto
Terra Grappler G2
Yes600.0AB

Best All Terrain Tires: Bottom Line

In this article, along with sharing helpful purchasing tips for those interested in purchasing an all-terrain tire, we reviewed the best all-terrain tires in 2024:

  1. Best All-Terrain Tire: Continental Terrain Contact A/T
  2. Best All-Terrain Tires for Snow: BFGoodrich Trail Terrain T/A
  3. Best Budget All-Terrain Tires: Firestone Destination A/T2
  4. Best All-Terrain Highway Tire: Goodyear Wrangler
  5. Best Tires for Light Trucks: Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus
  6. Best Riding All-Terrain Tire: Yokohama Geolandar G015
  7. Best Aggressive All-Terrain Tires: Toyo Open Country A/T III
  8. Best All-Terrain Tire for Daily Driving: Nitto Terra Grappler G2

All Terrain Tires: FAQ

Below are some common frequently asked questions about all terrain tires: 

What is the longest-lasting all-terrain tire?

There is no one longest-lasting all-terrain tire, as driving habits play a huge role in the overall durability of your tires. While responsible driving will elongate your tire’s tread life, a simple puncture could mean prematurely replacing your tires.

What is the most comfortable all-terrain tire?

According to our independent tire tester, the most comfortable all-terrain tire is the Yokohama Geolander AT G015. The Geolander AT G015 was the best in class for our overall comfort and road noise tests.

Which brand makes good all-terrain tires?

There isn’t one specific tire brand that makes better all-terrain tires than the rest. However, we found the Continental Terrain Contact A/T to be the Best All-Terrain Tire on the market in 2024.


Full All Terrain Tires Testing Methodology

The tire testing involved several timed laps averaged out. To ensure accurate results, Benson utilizes control tires to benchmark the track’s surface evolution and calculate each all-terrain tire’s rating in individual testing categories. The factors he measured for the tires included wet handling, dry handling, dirt handling, gravel handling, and overall comfort.

Each tire was given a rating out of 10.0 based on these criteria.

Wet Handling

Wet handling is one of the most important measurements in all-terrain tire tests because the wet grip of a tire can greatly affect how your vehicle responds in an emergency event. This wet handling test included three timed laps around one of Uvalde Proving Grounds’ tracks in very wet conditions.

Dry Handling

While all-terrain tires are meant to perform on- and off-road, they are primarily going to be used on the road by most drivers. This test included three timed laps around one of Uvalde Proving Grounds’ tracks in extremely dry conditions to simulate average road conditions.

Dirt Handling

Dirt handling is one of the most important factors to consider if you’re looking to take your pickup truck off the road on a regular basis. Benson went about testing each all-terrain tire’s dirt handling by averaging out the times of three laps around one of Uvalde Proving Grounds’ off-road tracks.

Gravel Handling

By nature, gravel handling is an important test to run, but especially difficult to do right. For each three-lap run, it takes 20 minutes of combing dirt and rocks to “fix” the track between each all-terrain tire test. As previously explained, this test consisted of three timed laps around one of Uvalde Proving Grounds’ off-road tracks.

Comfort

Benson considered each tire’s comfort on- and off-road in addition to their general road noise levels. He kept this category in mind and kept notes on comfort while performing testing for each of the other categories.

How We Score Products

Star ratings help us to differentiate between the top-performing products on the market. For the all-terrain tires in this review, we wanted to test on a scale of 1.0 to 10.0 stars because our testing involved an experienced tire expert. Based on our calculations, the all-terrain tires in this review scored an average of 8.82 out of 10.0 stars.

  • 10.0 Stars: A 10.0-star rating is the highest rating these tires can receive in our review. If the tires exceeded our expectations when it came to each testing criterion, you’d see a high score for the tires and likely a higher overall placement on the list of our top picks.

  • 9.0 to 6.0 Stars: A range between 9.0 and 6.0 stars means that the tires still exceeded our expectations but could have room for improvement. On the higher end of 9.0 stars, there may be slight changes we would like to see in the tire. For a 6.0-star rating, we may have some concerns about traction over time in wetter conditions.

  • 5.0 Stars: A 5.0-star rating is an average score. If the tires met our expectations but could use improvements across all the testing criteria we considered, you’ll likely see a 5.0-star rating with an indication of why our testing expert scored the tire lower than others.

  • 4.0 to 2.0 Stars: This range of scoring is below average. If the tires could not handle wet traction well and posed concern when we considered different climates potential buyers may be living in wetter conditions.

  • 1.0 Star: A 1.0-star rating is the lowest rating we would give in any review. If the tires in this review were defective in some way that affected installation, traction, or handling, we would give the tire a lower rating of 1.0 stars.

Why Trust Motor1.com

Each year, we test over 350 auto products on vehicles and in our testing lab. Our team of product testers thoroughly researches top products, unboxes and puts our hands on each component, and tests the items on real vehicles before making recommendations to readers.

We publish hundreds of product and service reviews to bring car enthusiasts detailed guides on automotive tools, detailing kits, car seats, pet products, and much more. For more information on our testing methodology and how we evaluate every product, check out our methodology page here.

Because our testing expertise is centered around aftermarket car products and accessories, we decided to leave tire testing in the hands of a true tire expert. That’s why we reached out to Jonathan Benson who has more than 15 years of experience. His insight and hands-on testing, combined with our extensive knowledge of aftermarket car products have been a perfect match.

*Data accurate at time of publication. Products subject to availability.