Speed Reads:

  • The best ultra-high performance (UHP) all-season tire in 2023 is the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4. The Pilot Sport All Season 4 has great ride quality and fuel economy and will ensure you have grip regardless of where you’re driving.
  • The Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus is a no-brainer if you want to invest in a UHP all-season tire that won’t be constantly searching for traction in the snow.
  • If you want a quality UHP all-season tire that won’t break the bank – the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ is worth considering.
Best All Season Performance Tire
Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4

A fantastic UHP all season tire that will provide the grip you need in any weather.

Best All Season Performance Tires for Snow
Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus

A UHP all season tire that’s particularly adept at providing traction in snow.

Best Budget All Season Performance Tires
Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+

A great UHP all season tire to consider if you value versatility and don’t want to break the bank.

Best UHP All Season Tires
Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus

A UHP all season tire that’s developed with sporty sedans and optimal performance in mind.

Ultra-high performance all-season tires are meant to provide grip in all seasons of the year and in virtually any weather conditions, without sacrificing performance. For those who don’t want to deal with the hassle of purchasing, storing, and installing separate sets of summer and winter tires, all-season tires are a great option.

We put several of the top brands through their paces and tested them in the snow, in wet conditions, and on dry roads. Below, we begin to delve into the world of UHP all-season tires and uncover the data that informed our ranking process for the best all-season performance tires.

All-Season Performance Tires

A close-up of tire tread.

For this review, our independent tester thoroughly tested and evaluated each all-season performance tire based on each tire’s dry handling, wet handling, and snow handling. The scores in each category are compiled into a cumulative rating that ranges from 1.0 to 10.0 and is used to rank the best UHP all-season tires.

Each UHP all-season tire’s ratings, including their scores in each review category, are highlighted below:

What Are The Best All-Season Performance Tires?

Based on these criteria, the best all-season performance tires are the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4, Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus, the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+, and Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus.

OverallWet
Handling
Dry
Handling
Snow
Handling
Comfort
Michelin
Pilot Sport
All Season 4
9.639.59.59.510.0
Continental
ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus
9.629.59.510.09.5
Bridgestone
Potenza RE980AS+
9.139.59.09.09.0
Pirelli
P Zero All Season Plus
9.009.510.08.08.5

All-Season Performance Tire Ratings: Our Testing Process

The all-season performance tires in this article went through two rounds of reviews. We started by searching retailers like TireRack and Discount Tire for top products, looking at factors such as tread patterns, siping, customer ratings, and prices.

Our independent tire tester, Jonathan Benson of TyreReviews.com, ordered tires from all the top brands on the market. He is internationally renowned for performing some of the most involved and thorough testing in the industry.

Jonathan tested each UHP all-season tire on a Genesis G70. Testing took place at the Michelin Laurens Proving Grounds in Mountville, South Carolina. Snow handling was tested during the winter months in Michigan.

Our tire testing, as always, consisted of a number of timed laps averaged out. Throughout testing, Benson utilizes control tires to benchmark the track’s surface evolution and calculates each tire’s rating in every single individual testing category. He took note of the tire’s dry handling, wet handling, and snow handling.

Each tire was given a rating out of 10.0 based on these criteria.

Wet Handling

On the road, the wet grip of a tire will likely determine your fate in an emergency. Hence the placing of wet handling at the top of our list of UHP all-season tire tests. This test involved three timed laps around one of Michelin Laurens Proving Grounds’ tracks in seriously wet conditions.

Dry Handling

For a lot of drivers, a UHP all-season tire’s performance in dry conditions is incredibly important. This test involved three timed laps around one of Michelin Laurens Proving Grounds’ tracks in bone-dry conditions to simulate average road conditions.

Snow Handling

Snow handling is an incredibly important factor to consider if you’re looking to take your coupe or sporty sedan on snow-covered roads. Benson went about testing each UHP all-season tire’s snow handling by averaging out the times of three laps around a carefully prepared snow-covered track located in the heart of Michigan.

Comfort

The “comfort” of each all-season performance tire is a subjective mixture of the tire’s overall comfort on the road as well as its general road noise level. This was evaluated throughout all other categories of testing and notes were taken throughout.

Why Trust Us

Each year, we test over 350 auto products on vehicles and in our testing lab. Our team of product testers thoroughly researches top products, unboxes and puts our hands on each component, and tests the items on real vehicles before making recommendations to readers.

We publish hundreds of product and service reviews to bring car enthusiasts detailed guides on automotive tools, detailing kits, car seats, pet products, and much more. For more information on our testing methodology and how we evaluate every product, check out our methodology page here.

Because our testing expertise is centered around aftermarket car products and accessories, we decided to leave tire testing in the hands of a true tire expert. That’s why we reached out to Jonathan Benson who has more than 15 years of experience. His insight and hands-on testing, combined with our extensive knowledge of aftermarket car products have been a perfect match.

All-Season Performance Tire Reviews

After testing several options ranging in price, we decided Michelin offers the Best All-Season Performance Tire because its Pilot Sport All Season 4 offers fantastic handling in the dry, wet, and snow alike while also being the most comfortable UHP all-season tire that we tested.

Best UHP All-Season Tires: Compare And Contrast

There are many reliable UHP all-season tires out there that may be the perfect match for your driving needs. Specifications that may play a deciding factor for many customers are 3PMSF, treadwear, traction, and temperature ratings:

Cost
(per tire)
3PMSFTreadwearTractionTemperature
Michelin
Pilot Sport
All Season 4
$177No540A – AAA
Continental
ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus
$139No560A – AAA
Bridgestone
Potenza RE980AS+
$169No500AAA
Pirelli
P Zero
All Season Plus
$189No500AAA

*Because cost data fluctuates due to regular pricing changes and tire size, the prices in the table above are approximate values that our team regularly updates.

For those interested in learning more, below are detailed reviews for each of the top five all-season performance tires:

1. Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4: Best All-Season Performance Tire

  • Cost: Starts at $177
  • 3PMSF: No
  • Treadwear: 540
  • Traction: A – AA
  • Temperature: A
  • Rolling resistance: 9.69 kilograms per ton (kg/T)

Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 Review

The Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 builds upon the foundation of the All Season 3 and A/S 3+. The Pilot Sport All Season 4 offers fantastic performance in both dry and wet weather conditions, as well as snow traction in wintry conditions. This tire is so good, in fact, that Chevrolet chose the Pilot Sport All Season 4 to be the first ever all-season tire utilized as original equipment (OE) on its mid-engine Corvette.

You can see how the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 performed in each category below: 

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling9.5
Dry Handling9.5
Snow Handling9.5
Comfort10.0
Overall Rating9.63

Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4: Our Experience

In terms of wet handling, the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 handled very well generally – grip was consistent and our independent tire tester, Jonathan Benson, experienced little to no understeer. Pushing the Pilot Sport All Season 4 past the limit on wet roads offered no notable drawbacks, the UHP all-weather tire was extremely controllable and progressive past the limit. However, it should be noted that this tire was hydroplaning in small patches throughout this test.

In terms of dry handling, the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 was simply just enjoyable to drive. It offered excellent grip while turning and was progressive when pushed past the limit. Benson did note a strange issue with under-braking from time to time, but he also noted that grip, steering, and balance weren’t in question.

The Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 was one of the best-handling UHP all-season tires that we tested in the snow. Once this tire was sliding, it was predictable and relatively easy to control. Additionally, the Pilot Sport All Season 4 was pretty grippy when turning in snow, but it won’t compare to one of the best snow tires.

Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 6 years / 45,000 miles half mileage for rear if different size than front
  • Uniformity: 1 year / first 2/32 inches of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 6 years / free replacement first year, 2/32 in. or 25 percent of wear, then prorated until 2/32 in. of remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: N/A

2. Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus: Best All-Season Performance Tires For Snow

  • Cost: Starts at $139
  • 3PMSF: No
  • Treadwear: 560
  • Traction: A – AA
  • Temperature: A
  • Rolling Resistance: 9.75 kg/T

Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus Review

The Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus is an ultra-high-performance tire for those who want to drive their car year-round. A silica-enhance rubber mixture offers all-season performance while traction grooves ensure your grip in light snow. This UHP all-season tire features Sport+ technology, which consists of macroblocks and a strong two-ply sidewall. Sport+ technology is designed to give drivers immediate steering response to maximize control while cornering.

Sweeping lateral and longitudinal grooves paired with interlocking sipes ensure you still have full-tilt performance in wet conditions. The interlocking X-sipes pair join forces with a nylon cap ply to stabilize the tread for optimal handling. These UHP all-season tires are also optimized to resist uneven tread wear and reduce road noise. It should be noted that this tire is backed by a 50,000-mile manufacturer’s warranty.

You can see how the Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling9.5
Dry Handling9.5
Snow Handling10.0
Comfort9.5
Overall Rating9.62

Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus: Our Experience

In our experience, the Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus is very similar to the Michelin at the limit on wet roads. Steering feed, speed, and grip were all very comparable to the Best All-Season Performance Tire, but aquaplaning at the rear axle was a bit more difficult to catch. Past the limit, we did feel this tire was a little less graceful than the Pilot Sport All Season 4.

On dry roads, the ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus offered more front-end grip mid-corner than other options and Benson noted he felt this tire had a long tread life, all things considered. Benson did say that the rear end felt relatively loose with these tires, so speed suffered a little bit.

In the snow, the Continental offered a nice, grippy initial turn-in but wasn’t as laterally progressive as the Michelin. The Michelin was easier to drive on the snow in Benson’s professional driving opinion, but he did note that the DWS 06 Plus offered more grip generally. Additionally, the Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus felt better than the Michelin in regards to straight-line braking and traction in the snow.

Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 6 years / 50,000 miles half mileage for rear if different size than front
  • Uniformity: 1 year / first 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 6 years / free replacement first year or 2/32 in. of wear, the prorated until 2/32-in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: 1 year / first 2/32 in. of wear

3. Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+: Best Budget All-Season Performance Tires

  • Cost: Starts at $169
  • 3PMSF: No
  • Treadwear: 500
  • Traction: AA
  • Temperature: A
  • Rolling resistance: 11.15 kg/T

Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ Review

The Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ is designed for quick coupes and sporty sedans. It offers uncompromising grip in all different types of driving conditions thanks to its new and improved rubber compound. Additionally, the RE980AS+ utilizes the classic asymmetric five-rib tread design that Potenza tires are known for.

You can see how the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ performed in each category below:

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling9.5
Dry Handling9.0
Snow Handling9.0
Comfort9.0
Overall Rating9.13

Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+: Our Experience

Wet traction was not an issue with the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and it was generally a very easy tire to drive on wet roads. At the limit, understeer was relatively progressive but our independent tire tester felt he couldn’t ask as much of this tire as he did our top two picks. Past the limit, Benson notes a longer recovery time at the rear.

On dry roads, the RE980AS+ was grippy, and on lap one, the tire was quite playful. However, towards the end of the second lap, it was clear the tire was too hot and had enough. In general, the tire felt quite spongy and the car felt like it was floating on the tire, ultimately meaning less communication than some of our higher-rated picks.

In the snow, Benson felt he had to drive more delicately to get the lap times he was expecting from this tire as it didn’t instill as much confidence as the Michelin or Continental all-season tires. He also noted that there was no front axle authority and he ended up bumping into two snow banks due to terminal understeer. Ultimately, Benson felt the Bridgestone RE980AS+ was more of an all-season tire than a UHP all-season tire.

Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 5 years / 50,000 miles half mileage for rear if different size than front
  • Uniformity: First 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 5 years / free replacement first 3 years, then prorated until 2/32-in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: N/A

4. Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus: Best UHP All-Season Tires

  • Cost: Starts at $189
  • 3PMSF: No
  • Treadwear: 500
  • Traction: AA
  • Temperature: A
  • Rolling resistance: 10.32 kg/T

Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus Review

The Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus was one of the best tires we’ve driven on dry roads. The P Zero All Season Plus utilizes a special tread compound that combines silica and polymers. Said tread compound is then molded into an asymmetric pattern to provide a quiet ride.

Winter siping technology is present in the inboard blocks, which ultimately increases the number of biting edges for optimal grip in winter conditions. However, we don’t recommend taking this tire into deep snow as it doesn’t feature a 3PMSF rating.

You can see how the Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus performed in each category below: 

Review CategoryScore (Out of 10.0)
Wet Handling9.5
Dry Handling10.0
Snow Handling8.0
Comfort8.5
Overall Rating9.00

Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus: Our Experience

In our experience, the Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus is a fun tire to drive on wet roads as it offers direct steering and similar grip to the Bridgestone. The Pirelli is good past the limit and was the most communicative tire that we tested.

In dry conditions, the P Zero All Season Plus offered good initial steering but lacked detail mid-corner. Our independent tire tester noted that this was the only tire that felt like it needed to heat up a little first, performing better on the second lap. Additionally, he says this is the only UHP all-season tire that he could do a third lap on.

In terms of snow traction, the Pirelli’s grip circle seemed fairly round but had a general lack of grip. Benson notes low grip in all directions when driving through snow, but mentions that he experienced few surprises, though he muses that’s due to low overall speeds. Ultimately, he says it’s clear this tire has more UHP all-season tire properties than standard all-season tire properties.

Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus Warranty Guide

  • Treadwear: 6 years / 50,000 miles half mileage for rear if different size than front
  • Uniformity: 1 year / first 2/32 in. of wear
  • Workmanship/materials: 6 years / free replacement first year or 2/32 in. of wear, then prorated until 2/32-in. remaining depth
  • Manufacturer’s road hazard: N/A

Ultra-High Performance All-Season Tires: Buying Guide

There are a myriad of all-season performance tires to sift through, and it’s tough to determine which will be best for you and your driving needs. We asked our independent tire tester, Jonathan Benson of Tyrereviews.com, if there’s any overarching qualities he looks for in a tire, regardless of seasonality or the level of performance they’re designed for. Here’s what he had to say:

There is an answer to that. I think wet performance, especially wet braking, is one of the more critical aspects of the tire…As the market is shifting, rolling resistance is becoming [something to look out for] – maybe less so for the US market, but I think it’s starting to pick up – so the rolling resistance or the energy use of the tire is starting to become a more important factor.”

Best Performance Tires All-Season: What You Need To Know

Regardless of which tire manufacturer or brand you purchase your tires from, there are a few things you should keep in mind. It’s important to understand a tire’s Uniform Tire Quality Grading (UTQG) and how to read a tire’s sidewall. Lastly, knowing how to maintain your tires is of utmost importance.

UTQG Standards

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is the governing body that created and now enforces federal safety standards for all tires sold in the United States. The UTQG standards were created by the NHTSA to help customers to make more informed purchasing decisions. Specific categories of UTQG ratings include:

  • Treadwear: This compares a tire’s tread against that of a control tire’s tread. A score of 100 indicates that the tested tire’s treads last as long as the control tire’s, 200 indicates that the tire lasts twice as long, and so on.
  • Traction: Graded on a scale of AA, A, B, and C, this rating is based on a tire’s braking g-force.
  • Temperature: Graded on a scale of A, B, or C, this tests a tire’s ability to withstand running at high speeds.

How To Read A Tire’s Sidewall

Trying to read a tire’s sidewall can be like trying to read a different language. For many, the letters and numbers on their tire’s sidewall mean next to nothing. With this in mind, we explain the types of information you can find from your tire’s sidewall:

  • Tire size: Tire size is also known as the width of the tire, this is the first set of numbers on the sidewall. Tire size is expressed in millimeters.
  • Type of tire: It’s easy to identify the type of tire you’re looking at by the letters included before the size of the tire. A tire without letters or with a “P” before the tire size is a passenger tire with a standard load (a four-ply rating).
  • Weight capacity: Tires with the letters “XL” after the tire size have a higher weight capacity than a standard load, but not higher than an “LT” tire. Tires with “LT” or “ST” before the tire size have a higher weight capacity, as “LT” stands for light truck and “ST” stands for special trailer.
  • Aspect ratio: The second set of numbers on a tire’s sidewall indicates the aspect ratio. This is expressed in a percentage, which is ultimately calculated by dividing the tire’s height measured from the rim to the tread by the tire’s width.
  • Type of construction: The type of construction is indicated directly after the aspect ratio on a tire’s sidewall. “R” stands for radial, which is the most common type of tire, “B” stands for bias, and “D” stands for diagonal. Plies run perpendicular to the tread in radial tires, while in bias and diagonal tires, plies overlap diagonally.
  • Rim diameter: After the type of construction is where the diameter of the rim is typically indicated. Rim diameter is expressed in inches.

Taking Care Of Your All-Season Performance Tires

Regardless of which set of all-season performance tires you set your sights on, if you don’t take care of them then you’ll end up spending a lot more than you need to. Below are a few simple steps you can take to get the best out of your tires:

  1. Wheel alignment: Wheels that are improperly aligned will cause your tires to wear unevenly. A proper wheel alignment can drastically improve the lifespan of your car’s tires.
  2. Tire rotation: Regularly rotating your tires, either by the recommendation made by your vehicle manufacturer or every 5,000 miles, will reduce the likelihood of uneven treadwear.
  3. Balance: Outside of unevenly worn tires, wheels that aren’t properly balanced can cause vibrations that make it unsafe to drive. Checking your wheels’ balance can ensure your tire lasts for its full life cycle.

Best All-Season Performance Tires: Bottom Line

In this article, along with sharing helpful purchasing tips for those interested in purchasing all-season performance tires, we reviewed the top four all-season performance tires in 2023:

  1. Best All-Season Performance Tire: Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4
  2. Best All-Season Performance Tires for Snow: Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus
  3. Best Budget All-Season Performance Tires: Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+
  4. Best UHP All-Season Tires: Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus

UHP All-Season Tires: FAQ

Below are some common frequently asked questions about all-season performance tires:

*Data accurate at time of publication.