The real question is, which would win the gold?

Curling. Figure skating. Luge. Ski Jumping. I would happily nix all of these Olympic sports in exchange for the inclusion of motorsport as an official event. There’s precedent, too. The second modern Olympiad, held in Paris in 1900, had both automobile and motorcycle racing.

More recently, there was the short-lived A1 Grand Prix in which the teams competing represented their home nations instead of companies or themselves. Lastly, the X Games, an Olympics for adrenaline junkies, currently includes Rallycross, Moto X, Gymkhana, and Stadium Super Trucks as official events.

So if car racing were an Olympic sport, what would it look like? First, we’d have to pick what kind of motorsport to make an official Olympic event. For me, it came down to a choice between Figure 8 School Bus racing and GT endurance racing. I chose the latter because my home country would be unfairly good at the former, which we invented by the way. U-S-A!

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GT endurance racing it is, then. I like that GT race cars are based on road-going production models; it gives fans a connection to the cars, and unlike a formula or spec series, allows for lots of variation in the design and mechanicals of each one. Plus, endurance racing means that in addition to speed, durability and strategy are also factors; the fastest car doesn’t always win these races.

Since each country participating would have to choose one car to race in Olympic Motorsport (that’s what I’m calling it), they would each have to create governing bodies to decide on the car that best represents their nation and then coordinate the effort. Thus, what follows is what we imagine the first field for Olympic Motorsport would like.