Hyundai Sonata Hybrid

From Hyundai press:

After moving to the top of the U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy rankings in 2009, Hyundai remains firmly committed to leading the auto industry in fuel efficiency. With the introduction of a powertrain lineup exclusively consisting of four cylinder engines and six-speed transmissions, Hyundai's 2011 Sonata sedan became the most efficient vehicle in its class with an EPA rated highway mileage of 40 mpg.
 
The next stage in Hyundai's efficiency drive is the North American introduction of the Direct Hybrid Blue Drive system. The Sonata Hybrid will debut in winter 2010 with a powertrain entirely developed in-house by Hyundai that includes several technical firsts. These innovations allow the Sonata to provide performance and efficiency improvements not available in other hybrids.

The first production application of Hyundai Hybrid Blue Drive actually debuted in mid-2009 on the Korean domestic market Elantra LPI mild-hybrid.  As implemented in the 2011 Sonata Hybrid, Direct Hybrid Blue Drive is now a full parallel hybrid system. The Sonata Hybrid can be driven in zero emissions, fully electric drive mode at speeds up to 62 miles per hour or in blended gas-electric mode at any speed. When the car comes to a stop and the electrical load is low, the engine is shut down to completely eliminate idle fuel consumption and emissions.
 
The first production application of Hyundai Hybrid Blue Drive actually debuted in mid-2009 on the Korean domestic market Elantra LPI mild-hybrid.  As implemented in the 2011 Sonata Hybrid, Direct Hybrid Blue Drive is now a full parallel hybrid system. The Sonata Hybrid can be driven in zero emissions, fully electric drive mode at speeds up to 62 miles per hour or in blended gas-electric mode at any speed. When the car comes to a stop and the electrical load is low, the engine is shut down to completely eliminate idle fuel consumption and emissions.

The lithium polymers cells, developed with our partner LG Chem, use a manganese spinel chemistry that provides an excellent balance between power delivery, energy density and thermal stability. Thermal stability is critical to ensuring durability eliminating the need to replace the battery pack during the normal lifespan of the vehicle. The electrodes in older lithium ion chemistries expand and contract with the heating and cooling that occurs during charging and discharging. This thermal expansion causes cracks in the electrodes which ultimately reduces the cell's ability to hold a charge. Manganese spinel lithium polymer cells have much lower expansion rates and are thus able to go through tens of thousands of charge cycles even without having to use a heavier, liquid cooling system.

The power and energy density of this new battery type allowed Hyundai engineers to create a lighter and more compact battery pack that maximizes Sonata cargo space. The Sonata Hybrid’s 1.4 kilowatt-hour battery pack weighs in at just 95.9 pounds versus the 123.9 pounds for the nickel metal hydride pack in the Toyota Camry Hybrid.  In addition to the 20-30 percent mass reduction, the lithium polymer battery is 40 percent smaller in volume and 10 percent more efficient.

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Hyundai Sonata Hybrid