Daimler believes an electric vehicle must have a range of at least 310 miles (500 kilometers) to really go up against a conventionally-powered vehicle.

Daimler believes an electric vehicle must have a range of at least 310 miles (500 kilometers) to really go up against a conventionally-powered vehicle.

Speaking with US media at the Geneva Motor Show, Daimler’s CEO Dieter Zetsche said 310 miles is “probably a reasonable number to pursue.” On the other hand, he admitted there isn’t an exact figure which would automatically boost EV sales in the detriment of cars with combustion engines.

He went on to specify the growth of the electric vehicle market depends on a number of factors, with one of the most important being battery cost. Zetsche estimates the current cost of batteries stands at $170 (€155) per kilowatt-hour and he believes dropping to $110-130 (€100-119) would make EVs more competitive in the “battle” with conventional vehicles.

He believes the expanding availability of plug-in hybrid models represents a step towards a pure electric future. Mercedes’ rival Audi through the voice of its CEO Rupert Stadler describes hybrids and plug-in hybrids only as a “bridging technology” for about a decade until a broader adoption of EVs.

At the same time, Mercedes is also making efforts to promote hydrogen vehicles and have announced the GLC will receive an F-CELL variant in 2017. The model is estimated to have a range between 250 and 300 miles which will be more than double compared to the B-Class Electric Drive’s 124-mile range.

Source: europe.autonews.com

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EVs need 310-mile range to compete with conventional cars, says Daimler