Sources close to the matter cited by Reuters have shed some light regarding the controversial and illegal defeat device.

Sources close to the matter cited by Reuters have shed some light regarding the controversial and illegal defeat device.

For seven consecutive years, Volkswagen used a so-called defeat device on their 1.2 TDI, 1.6 TDI and 2.0 TDI engines to cheat during emissions tests and it seems they actually put a lot of effort into optimizing the software. Now, three sources familiar with the issue told Reuters they elaborated more than just one software as apparently four engine types have received the defeat device which suggests the deception could be more complex than what VW has confessed so far.

According to industry experts, more than just a few engineers were involved in these illegal maneuvers taking into account there are several iterations of the defeat device and this required a lot of "work". Interestingly, Arndt Ellinghorst, an analyst at banking advisory firm Evercore ISI., the number of employees involved in this scandal will have a direct impact on the amount of fines VW will receive and will ultimately have an influence on management changes and also on what the investors will do.

Volkswagen has already lost 25% of its stock market value and according to Credit Suisse the dieselgate will cost them anywhere between €23 to €78 billion.

Source: Reuters via Automotive News Europe

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Dieselgate saga continues as new report says VW actually had several versions of defeat device