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Aston Martin is the latest automaker to detail how it plans to embrace electrification. It was supposed to happen a few years ago with the revival of Lagonda as a purely electric sub-brand. However, the plan was ultimately axed, and we can say the same thing about the Rapid E. The folks from Gaydon have taken a shy attempt towards a greener lineup by giving the DBX a mild-hybrid inline-six engine in China.

A more substantial progress will be done by applying the Racing Green strategy announced today, on April 22, to coincide with Earth Day. As with other companies, the ultimate goal is to achieve carbon neutrality across the manufacturing and supply chain. If everything goes according to the plan, it's going to happen in 2039. To get there, the first order of business is to launch a plug-in hybrid model, the mid-engined Valhalla, of which deliveries will commence in early 2024.

Aston Martin Racing Green strategy

The first AM without a combustion engine is bound to arrive a year later, with all of the company's models to offer a hybrid or EV option by 2026. Four years later, the "entire core portfolio of GT sports cars and SUVs" will be fully electrified. Reading between the lines, we believe the use of the word "core" suggests there still might be limited-run supercars and/or hypercars with a combustion engine. Hopefully, this will turn out to be true rather than just wishful thinking on our part.

The plan to have zero emissions from its GTs and SUVs could have something to do with a statement CEO Tobias Moers said last year. He said that by 2030, only five percent of the company's annual production will consist of gasoline-fueled cars, and that all of them would be restricted to the track. If that plan is still standing, it means in fewer than eight years from now, there will be no more street-legal, ICE-powered Aston Martin models.

As a final note, here's an interesting fact shared by Aston Martin. Out of the 109,000 vehicles it has manufactured in its 109-year history, it is estimated that 95 percent of them are still on the road to this day.

Gallery: 2022 Aston Martin Valhalla production model

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