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Alpina introduced the XB7 only about a year and a half ago, but with BMW preparing a facelift for the X7, the Buchole-based car manufacturer (it's not a tuner) must do the same. It's a similar story with the already controversial split headlight layout as the classier alternative to Bavaria's flagship SUV must also follow suit to mirror the donor vehicle. Both should come out at one point next year, likely as 2023MY products in the United States.

It's still too premature to cast any final judgments regarding the appearance since the SUV is wearing a lot of camouflage. We can however talk about the upper LED daytime running lights as there are rectangular cutouts in the disguise, showing the DRLs will be positioned right where the bumper meets the hood.

Gallery: 2023 Alpina XB7 facelift spy photos

Where have we seen this layout already? On the Concept XM, and much like the plug-in hybrid SUV arriving next year in production guise, the BMW X7 and the equivalent Alpina XB7 will have the main headlights lower on the bumper. However, we're getting the impression the low/high beam cluster won't be as hidden as on the electrified luxobarge where it sits behind a heavily tinted panel.

To be honest, we are getting used to the idea of BMW's new layout for the headlights, and we will be seeing more of it since the next-generation 7 Series will adopt a similar look. As for the grille, it doesn't appear to be bigger, not that it needed to grow any further since it's already imposingly large. At the back, revised LED graphics for the taillights are peeking through the disguise.

We can easily tell it's an Alpina prototype by the alloy wheel design and the quad exhaust tip finishers at the back, which not even the BMW X7 M50i has. The X7 M substitute should soldier on with its twin-turbo, 4.4-liter V8 engine pushing out 612 horsepower and 590 pound-feet (800 Newton-meters) of torque. That's 89 hp and 37 lb-ft (50 Nm) more than you get in the M Performance X7 and enough to hit 60 mph in four seconds flat en route to an electronically governed 180 mph (290 km/h).

As a final note, we can't help but wonder whether Alpina and BMW will ink a deal for the former to work on the XM, but even if that's going to happen, don't expect it sooner than 2023.

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