Update: Added automaker statement on the investigation.

A potential stalling issue could affect over 600,000 Ram pickup trucks equipped with Cummins 6.7-liter turbodiesel engines. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has launched an investigation into this situation, listing 22 complaints and two field reports regarding alleged stalling or loss of motive power in a statement released on October 18.

The investigation covers 2019 and 2020 model-year Ram trucks, including 2500 and 3500 trims as well as larger 4500 and 5500 models. High-pressure fuel pumps are the focus of the investigation, with NHTSA reporting fuel pump failures as the cause of the stalling issue in its complaints. In most cases, the problem occurred at speeds above 25 mph and the vehicles were permanently disabled. Presumably, that simply means the vehicles couldn't be restarted and not something more drastic.

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The investigation was opened on October 14, but it's not the first time fuel pumps on Ram diesel trucks have come under scrutiny. Ram issued a technical service bulletin to dealerships seeking feedback on engine problems relating to 2018-2020 Ram diesel trucks. The TSB was issued in June 2020 and has since gone through several revisions. According to the NHTSA, this feedback program led Ram to hone in on fuel pumps. Motor1.com contacted Ram for additional information on this situation and received this official statement:

"We will, as always, cooperate fully with NHTSA's investigation, while continuing our own fact-finding in support of our customers." 

At this stage, we've not heard of any accidents resulting from this possible issue, nor has there been a recall. Stalling issues with any vehicle can be potentially dangerous, especially on busy highways. With some Ram HD trucks capable of towing up to 37,100 pounds – and the investigation stating reported issues generally happen at speeds over 25 mph – a loss of engine power could be particularly risky should it happen at the wrong time.

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