Today we go back in time and revisit the year 1989 when Porsche unveiled the intriguing Panamericana concept.

Today we go back in time and revisit the year 1989 when Porsche unveiled the intriguing Panamericana concept.

It's the year 1989 and Ferry Porsche (Ferdinand Anton Ernst Porsche), the son of company founder Ferdinand Porsche, is celebrating his 80th birthday. One of the gifts he received was a one-off Panamericana concept which was showcased that year at the Frankfurt Motor Show and was a huge hit among the attendance.

It was considerably different than the regular Porsche of those days due to its low-positioned glass transparent roof which could be removed entirely along with the rear window to provide the sense of openness. The concept also boasted a 959-inspired front fascia, spectacular wheel arches while at the back the taillights were interconnected via a red panel similar to what the 928 had. Responsible for creating the concept was Ulrich Bez (now CEO at Aston Martin) who went for a special turquoise blue paint for what looks like a dune buggy 911.

Porsche chose this name as a reference to the Carrera Panamericana, an endurance race during the early 50s in Mexico. The concept was based on the Carrera 4 but with a carbon fiber body and was capable of reaching 60 mph (96 km/h) in less than six seconds before topping out at 160 mph (257 km/h). This was possible thanks to a six-cylinder engine outputting 247 bhp (184 kW) at 6,100 rpm and 228 Nm (168 lb-ft) at 4,800 rpm with the power being channeled to both axles through a five-speed manual gearbox.

Be part of something big

Remembering the odd 1989 Porsche Panamericana concept