"Cars and Crosbie" talks us through the contingency plan.

The Covid-19 pandemic has changed life as we know it, and amongst many, the manufacturing industry is feeling much of the pressure. In fact, General Motors has put a temporary hold on Corvette C8 production because of a parts shortage. So what happens now?

Car enthusiast and YouTuber Morgan Crosbie assures us that C8 customers aren’t dead in the water. The Bowling Green, Kentucky based production facility has been shut down and will remain closed until next week or the week of October 19th. Rather than simply lowering production capacity and keeping things moving, Chevrolet has made the difficult decision to wait for a parts surplus to get things moving again.

Gallery: 2021 Chevy Corvette C8 Red Mist Paint

While operational, the factory was producing an average of between 800 and 850 Corvettes per week. After reopening in May, the factory has been working flat out to make up for the backlog of orders since its initial closure during the opening surge of Coronavirus in the United States. 

Thankfully, as GM announced its Second Shift initiative in April, hiring 400 additional workers, there will be a total of 1,300 employees eager to build C8’s when production resumes. As unfortunate as the delay is, it’s there to ensure that your pride and joy is manufactured to the highest possible standard.

Things are different for those of you in Canadian Markets, as regrettably, vehicle deliveries will be halted after the second week of November. While your options are limited, Crosbie declared it a blessing in disguise as the roads would be inundated with snow regardless; he hinted at a future episode covering tips and tricks for winter vehicle storage from engineers at the Michelin factory in South Carolina.

Despite the brief shutdown, Chevrolet is committed to building out all of the existing 2020 Corvette orders that have yet to materialize. That's good news for the car we crowned one of the coolest you can buy this year.