Every vehicle needs a bath at some point.

As petrolheads, we often take car washing for granted. Most road vehicles can easily be washed and detailed by one person in a relatively short amount of time. That said, there are many industries where keeping equipment and vehicles squeaky clean is more important and not as easy. Freeze Lists features these various cleansing technologies in its latest video.

You might not think of it, but it’s imperative that airplanes remain spotless. Not only does it lead to higher fuel efficiency, but automating the process means the birds spend less time in a wash bay and more time in the air. MSG Productions designed a completely self-contained and programmable system to keep just about any airliner spick and span. For customers in cooler climates, the MSG wash is also capable of de-icing with the same speed and accuracy.

On the simpler side, it’s vital that propellers on container ships and other vessels remain clean and polished. Like airplanes in the sky, ultraclean blades cut through the water with less drag. Keeping them pristine is a more rudimentary job compared to the automated MSG system. Even today, polishing them on this scale requires a diver to suit up and massage each individual blade with a tool.

One of the more identifiable processes is the truck wash. Regardless of the size or shape of the vehicle, all of these machines essentially embody automated car washes on a massive scale. The biggest example is an outdoor wash bay for a mining truck that must be over four stories tall. We’re not sure where the company sources the water for such an operation, but we wouldn’t want to be on the wrong end of it. 

Aside from the massive car wash, one system that really sticks out is the truck cannon. As you’d probably guess from the name, the dirty vehicle is parked in a wash bay and a worker utilizes a hard-mounted fire hose to blast the dirt away. We’d guess the entire YouTube detailing community would be champing at the bit to have a go on this machine.

Source: Freeze Lists via YouTube