Try to understand the whole thing. We dare you.

The 2020 Chevy Corvette C8 is an engineering marvel, arguably. With performance numbers (0 to 60 miles per hour in 2.8 seconds) coming from a relatively conservative output figure, coming with a price tag that undercuts several European exotics, it's rightfully so. Not to mention, the move to a mid-engine platform after 70 decades of having the engine at the front wasn't a small feat.

Credits to Chevrolet for making the C8 as it is right now but actually, the Corvette C8 has a turbo encabulator, or turboencabulator, installed to boost its performance to achieve the incredible numbers – that's if you'll take the word of Michael Brown (as Claymore Meine) as explained on the video embedded on top of this page.

Gallery: Next-Gen Chevy Corvette C9 Renderings

Okay, we're using explained here loosely because if it isn't obvious, Meine wasn't really trying to explain anything, let alone, a fictional mechanical part that has been around for decades.

For the uninitiated, turbo encabulator has been an inside joke for automotive engineers for several years. In fact, it was born in 1944, long before most of the running automotive nameplates these days. Think of it like a joke between you and your friends, like a cat or a prank video, but in a very nerdy way.

Of note, turboencabulators are really important enough to have its own Wikipedia page. 

So, for those who went through Corvette Academy videos to look for turbo encabulator before even opening this article, well, we're sorry for wasting your time. Don't take things too seriously, okay?

Just watch the video above and try to understand what Brown was saying, we dare you. Or at least try to finish the video for a satisfying end to this mess.