It can fit a snowmobile inside, too.

Customizing your camper comes with countless benefits. You can find your own solutions to on-the-go living problems, building it out as you want without having to rely on some manufacturer. That gave Mike Basich, pro snowboarder and off-the-grid enthusiast, a ton of freedom to create something unique that would fit his needs, starting with a Mitsubishi Fuso chassis before going wild. The outside appearance alone should let everyone know that this isn’t your typical home-away-from-home.

Nearly every aspect of Basich’s camper is customized. The metal exterior will, one day, rust away, but he can wrap it in whatever he wants thanks to a protective, waterproof layer underneath. There are solar panels up top, and a Tommy Gate at the back – capable of lifting a piano or Basich’s snowmobile, which can fit inside. The side of the camper also opens with a deck and awning – like a taco truck – opening the inside to the great outdoors.

It has a water heater, two-person bed, dinette table, TV, single-basin sink, stove, furnace, and fridge. There’s no shower, but it does have a bath. Underneath the floor next to the big side opening is a bathtub, which lets Basich bathe right next to nature. There’s also a wood stove that swings out, providing extra heat that doesn’t rely on propane or electricity. There is a propane heater with a thermostat, too. There are soft-closing kitchen drawers, heated floors – though they’re not hooked up – and extra storage beneath the floor.

The kitchen, which sits opposite the big side opening, slides out to expand the indoor living space. Instead of putting a traditional wood ceiling on the extended portion, Basich used plexiglass. This allows for a ton of natural light to pour into the interior. It’s waterproof, too. The 42-gallon water tank is also inside to keep it from freezing.

Gallery: Custom Mitsubishi Fuso Camper

Basich lists off the prices of many of the items he used to build his camper and none seemed unreasonably priced. Granted, building it with your own two hands does help keep costs under control. It’s also an example of what you can build when you put your mind to a project. One piece of advice Basich gives is that if you’re going to build something, make sure it’s easy to use because you won’t use it otherwise.

Source: FLORB via YouTube