Only one city on the list has a population of over one million.

Speed kills. It's not the speed itself of course, but that abrupt stop that either jostles your internal organs to mush, or sends you tumbling through the air en route to another sudden stop. Point being, speed comes with consequences, and not all drivers on the road are created equal.

The good news is that speed-related deaths in the U.S. have declined over the past decade or so, especially in the youngest demographic of age 15 to 19. This comes despite speed limits which have generally increased in many areas, but there are still parts of the country where speed-related traffic fatalities are tragically high.

Compare Auto Insurance took a deep dive into data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration from 2013 through 2017, examining speeding-related fatalities in various cities.  Here’s a breakdown of the top 15 where speeding deaths are the worst percentage-wise, compared to total traffic fatalities.

City Speed Fatalities (PCT) Speed Fatalities Total Traffic Fatalities Population
North Las Vegas, NV 53.9% 41 76 234,389
Irving, TX 52.2% 48 92 235,648
Cleveland, OH 51.9% 94 181 388,812
Fontana, CA 50.7% 36 71 207,086
Plano, TX 49.2% 31 63 281,566
Washington D.C. 49.2% 61 124 672,391
Saint Louis, MO 48.6% 121 249 314,867
Milwaukee, WI 47.3% 131 277 599,086
Chicago, IL 43.4% 278 640 2,722,586
Aurora, CO 42.9% 51 119 357,323
Fresno, CA 42.6% 72 169 519,037
Yonkers, NY 42.1% 16 38 200,999
Chula Vista, CA 41.7% 25 60 264,101
Stockton, CA 40.7% 55 135 304,358
Charlotte, NC 40.6% 159 392

826,060

As the chart shows, the worst percentage doesn't equate to the most speed-related traffic fatalities. Chicago leads this list of 15 in that department with 278 deaths reported from 2013 to 2017, though its population of nearly 3 million is 10 times that of many cities in this group. Yonkers had the fewest speed-related fatalities at 16. 

Hit the source link below to see the full results of the study and a comprehensive list of 111 cities around the United States.