The first-generation GTS coupes were doomed from day one.

Before we get into the meat of this article, we’re obligated to offer two disclaimers. One, the content that follows does include the graphic destruction of two first-generation Dodge Viper GTS coupes. If you’re a fan of this iconic 1990s American muscle machine, you might want to consider reading about some video game updates that could be coming for Forza Horizon 4. Two, these videos are nearly six years old and it’s tough to verify exactly what the circumstances are here. What we can say for certain is, at least two Dodge Vipers are well and truly obliterated.

 

That said, we’ll give a shout out to The Drive for catching all this through an Instagram post from only_vipers. That post just went up a week ago, but it features video footage of a black Viper GTS posted by Shawn C on YouTube nearly six years ago. That video channel has only one other clip, and yes, it’s more Viper destruction at what looks like the same yard. Oh the humanity.

As mentioned, we have no clear context for these videos that we can confirm, but The Drive highlights a third video clip from Dayton 24/7 news that talks about Chrysler’s initiative to crush 93 pre-production Vipers. The cars were reportedly all models from various generations that had been donated to trade schools, where they were used for education and training purposes. All the vehicles were still owned by Chrysler, and with the education role fulfilled, each was returned to the automaker and crushed.

Why such a dark fate for cool cars such as these? Simply put, they are too great a legal risk to automakers. Should one of these machines be involved in any sort of on-road incident, the automaker could be held liable since these were never intended for road use. Even using parts could cause legal nightmares should something happen, which is why these poor Vipers go to the grave fully equipped with wheels and yes, the big V10 engine. Tragic though it may be, this is pretty much the fate of every pre-production car built by major automakers.

We just aren’t usually privy to graphic video and grating commentary of the event.