The good news is, we don't have to wait for long for the hybrid model.

The Ferrari F8 Tributo has been revealed at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show as a replacement to the 488 GTB. It posted impressive numbers along with its 88-pound weight savings compared to its predecessor: 720 horsepower and 568 pound-feet (770 Newton-meters) of torque generated by the twin-turbo 3.9-liter V8 that allows a 0-62 mph (0-100 kph) sprint for as little as 2.9 seconds (down by 0.1s compared to the GTB). Its 0 to 124 mph (200 kph) only 7.8 seconds with a top speed of 211 mph (340 kph).

It's indeed a force to be reckoned with, but its status as a 488 replacement instead of an all-new model poses a lot of questions. Why did Ferrari produce a car to replace a model that was also a replacement to a 10-year old name?

Gallery: Ferrari F8 Tributo at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show

Ferrari's chief technical officer Michael Leiters offered some answer with its interview with Road & Track. Just a brief background, the Italian Prancing Horse has been caught testing a 488 hybrid model before the Geneva event. As such, it was presumed that the replacement to the 488 in the marque's lineup would be electrified and will serve as a new platform for future Ferraris with a hybrid powertrain layout.

According to Leiters, however, they chose to go with F8's path instead of hybridization to be more focused on daily usability. So instead of an all-new car, they amped up the 488 to have it sit between the current GTB and Pista. It's just a matter of allocating the slots for the cars presumably to save money.

The good news is, the upcoming hybrid model will be a totally new animal that will be focused on track performance. Even better, Ferrari CEO Louis Calmieri confirmed that the hybrid model will arrive in two to three months.

Besides, the F8 Tributo, beyond its impressive performance numbers, is a lot better than the 488 GTB when it comes to aerodynamic efficiency – 15 percent better, to be exact. With this, this new car isn't exactly new but it is a significant improvement from its predecessor.

Source: Road & Track