The complexity of the electronics meant that it took six weeks before the engine started, even after installation was complete.

Sometimes when you really want something, you have to make it yourself. Since BMW never built an M5 Touring during the F11 generation that spanned the 2011 to 2017 model years, the German tuners at CFD decided to create one. 

The result is a performance wagon that looks at first glance like something straight from a BMW showroom, but you realize this estate is far from stock after looking closer. For example, CFD fitted a carbon fiber front and rear fascia from a Japanese firm, and the parts gave the machine a subtly more aggressive appearance. The tuner also worked with a German company to create a unique exhaust that matched a low growl emitting from the pipes but without being too loud.

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The real magic is the powertrain, though. The 4.4-liter twin-turbo V8 features upgraded turbos that push the output to around 800 horsepower (597 kilowatts), although the shop estimates that 950 hp (708 kW) is possible with a little extra work. A beautiful carbon fiber intake routes air to the forced induction system, and new intercoolers keep things cool. It took six weeks to connect the 37 onboard sensors so that they communicated together to let the engine start. The shop even managed to get the lane departure warning working.

Inside, there's a beautiful mix of black leather and Alcantara. Green stitching adds a little pop of color to the cabin.

Unfortunately, a build like this one is likely the nearest the motoring world can get to an M5 wagon anytime soon. There's no indication at this time that BMW intends to put the higher output 4.4-liter twin-turbo V8 into the estate. The closest equivalent is the next-gen X5 M, although the higher ride height means an increased center of gravity, which would hurt the SUV's handling prowess in comparison to a wagon.

Source: Evolve Automotive via YouTube