When life gives you lemons, you make lemonade. Ernie Adams didn’t get lemons, he got refrigerators. Naturally he did what any normal person would do in such a situation – he cut them up and turned them into miniature cars. Wait, what?

That’s the short version of how Adams started building (literally) his collection of dwarf cars. The slightly longer version is much more interesting, culminating with the life-like creations you see here. Dennis Gage from My Classic Car paid a visit to the Adams homestead in Arizona to see these cars in person, and are we ever glad he did because whoa, these things are beyond cool. And they all came from old refrigerators? Well sort-of; we’ll talk more about that in a bit.

Check out these crazy creations:

First up are the three stars of this video clip. Old car gurus will instantly recognize the classic lines of the 1949 Mercury,  1940 Mercury, and 1939 Chevrolet and yes, Adams built them from scratch right down to the curved body work and knobs on the dash. It’s safe to say he has no small amount of talent for fabrication – just look at chrome grille on the 40 Merc if you have any question on his skill. The only parts not of his design are the engine, driveline, and suspension components, all of which come from Toyota. In other words, they look great and they’ll run forever. Well played Mr. Adams.

Dwarf Cars
Dwarf Cars
Dwarf Cars
Dwarf Cars

This whole thing started some years ago when Adams decided to cut up some old refrigerators and make some novelty cars. He built his first one back in 1965 and styled it after a race car, and like any addicting car hobby it evolved from there. The two Mercurys and the Chevy are no doubt the headlining acts of his collection, though creating those and making them street legal involved more than just some old fridge parts. Over the years he even built his own jigs and machining tools to fabricate components to the finest detail, and boy does it show. He's so confident in his work that he drives them long distance, and he once maxed the Chevy out at 99 mph on the highway, though he probably doesn’t want the highway patrol to know about that.

Dwarf Cars
Dwarf Cars

Without a sense of scale, you wouldn’t know these were actually miniature replicas at a glance, or even with a hard look for that matter. Perhaps the best part of this video is toward the end when the miniature Chevy pulls out to pass its full-size doppelgänger. If you don’t do a double take and break into a grin at that point, you need to go back to cool school for a refresher on what it means to be car crazy. If you're lucky you'll get Mr. Adams as your professor.

 

Source: MyClassicCarTV via YouTube

 

Gallery: Dwarf Cars

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