Students from Skoda's vocational school have been tasked to chop off the Karoq's roof.

Revealed:

Power comes from the VW Group's familiar 1.5 TSI allowing the Karoq Cabriolet concept to hit 62 mph (100 kph) in 8.4 seconds before topping out at 127 mph (204 kph). We also get to learn it has the same length, width, and wheelbase as the regular Karoq, but with a redesigned rear end and a new exhaust system. The A- and B-pillars have also been modified, while the door handles are now illuminated. Rounding off the changes are special indicator lights and new bumpers incorporating projectors showing the Skoda logo on the tarmac at night.

Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet, Range Rover Evoque Convertible, VW T-Roc Convertible – these are some of the oddities created to blur the line between an SUV and a convertible. Skoda is going down the same road with the upcoming Karoq Convertible, but (thankfully) it will remain strictly as a concept. Modified by the talented students at Skoda’s vocational school, the study will be unveiled to the public in June.

Check out other projects by Skoda's students:

Aged 17 and 18, the 20 students come from seven different professions and have been tasked to give the Karoq a split personality by turning it into a convertible. Details about the one-off creation have not been disclosed, but the adjacent teaser image shows the quirky mashup will forgo the rear doors. Judging by the tall rear end, the vehicle is likely being engineered to accommodate a retractable roof that will be stowed behind the seats.

It remains to be seen whether it’ll be a fabric top or a metal roof, though we’re leaning towards the former. One of the sketches attached below suggests the Karoq Cabriolet study will not only lose the rear doors, but also the rear seats taking into account there doesn’t seem to be enough room behind the front seats for a second row.

Skoda CitiJet concept
Skoda FUNstar
Skoda Atero Coupe
Skoda Element electric buggy concept

Far from being the first project from Skoda’s vocational school, the one-off cabriolet-SUV will follow four other unique cars introduced in recent years. The first of the bunch was a two-seater Citigo (2014), followed by a Fabia pickup (2015), a Rapid Spaceback coupe (2016), and a Citigo electric buggy (2017).

As it was the case with the previous four concepts, the new Karoq Cabriolet is being developed with input coming from Skoda’s designers.

Source: Skoda

2018 Skoda Sunroq concept

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ŠKODA STUDENTS’ 5TH CONCEPT CAR ABOUT TO MAKE ITS DEBUT

Students of the ŠKODA Vocational School have built a convertible version of the brand’s latest SUV model.

› ŠKODA trainees’ new concept car is a convertible variant of the ŠKODA KAROQ
› The SUV study wows with its dynamic and sporty design as well as its open-air feel 
› The fifth ŠKODA student concept car will be presented in June 2018
› The student cars regularly demonstrate the high level of quality of ŠKODA AUTO’s vocational training

Mladá Boleslav, 4 May 2018 – With the new student concept car, a cabriolet version of the ŠKODA KAROQ, the Czech car manufacturer is presenting an open-top SUV. The convertible study has been designed and built by 23 trainees from the ŠKODA Vocational School in Mladá Boleslav. The project has become a tradition for ŠKODA AUTO: the convertible SUV is already the fifth student concept car.

Students from the ŠKODA AUTO Vocational School in Mladá have demonstrated their design skills this year too. The trainees’ concept car, an open-top ŠKODA KAROQ, is based on the production version of the successful compact SUV. At 4,382 mm, the length of the KAROQ cabriolet remains unchanged, as does the width (at 1,811 mm) and the wheelbase (at 2,638 mm). However, the convertible KAROQ is significantly lower thanks to the use of shock absorbers from the ŠKODA OCTAVIA RS.

The engineering design phase of the open-top ŠKODA KAROQ started in October 2017. The 23 trainees from the ŠKODA Vocational School involved in the concept car could count on the support from their teachers and the Technical Development as well as Design and Production departments from the very beginning. After the engineering and design plans had been finalised in January 2018, the construction phase began. At the beginning of June, the finished ŠKODA KAROQ cabriolet will be presented to the public.

The labour-intensive conversion of the project initially required the students to make extensive changes to the production body of the ŠKODA KAROQ. Once the roof had been removed, the doors had to be adjusted and the tailgate had to be re-designed from scratch. In addition, the trainees re-engineered the entire rear section including the exhaust system. In addition, the A- and B-pillars were altered. The ŠKODA KAROQ cabriolet features modified front and rear bumpers.

To emphasise the open-top ŠKODA KAROQ’s extraordinary character, the trainees either developed all-new ideas or modified some of the existing features, such as the ŠKODA logos, which are discreetly luminous in the dark. Special indicator lights as well as backlit door handles are other examples of the car’s distinctive features. In the dark, ŠKODA logos are projected onto the tarmac from the front and rear bumpers.

The convertible ŠKODA KAROQ student concept car is equipped with a four-cylinder 1.5 TSI engine. This efficient yet powerful unit allows the production ŠKODA KAROQ to reach a top speed of 204 km/h, and to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in 8.4 seconds.

To finish the unique open-top ŠKODA KAROQ, one final decision has yet to be made: the trainees’ project needs to be given a suitable name.

The convertible ŠKODA KAROQ is the latest model in the student car line-up, with which the Czech car manufacturer underlines the high level of quality of its vocational training. The ŠKODA Vocational School in Mladá Boleslav was founded in 1927 and offers three- and four-year training courses in technical subjects leading to either a certificate of proficiency or a school leaving certificate for university access. Currently, more than 900 full-time students are enrolled in the school’s courses.