A fully electric Lambo isn't on the horizon, though. The tech isn't ready yet in the company's opinion.

Don't expect future Lamborghinis to follow the Urus' use of a turbocharged engine because the company doesn't like that they put a damper a sports car engine's exhaust note. Conversely, the firm believes that hybrids are a better option because they cut emissions but still allow for an amazing sounding powerplant.

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"I think the CO2 [requirements] will be attacked in the future with a hybrid machine, where we can leave the emotional naturally aspirated appeal but reduce dramatically the CO2 and fuel consumption using a hybrid," Lamborghini Chief Technical Officer Maurizio Reggiani told CarAdvice.

Reggiani indicated that the the eventual replacements for the Aventador and Huracán would retain naturally aspirated engines, but they might gain some hybrid assistance. He sees this as having two major advantages: better throttle response and providing a differentiating factor over turbocharged, supercar competitors from brands like Ferrari and McLaren.

Reggiani has been fairly open about discussing the possibility of future hybrid models. At the 2018 Detroit Auto Show, he said that the company was working out ways to counter the increase in weight from the added motors and batteries for the next Aventador. Some savings could come from using cutting-edge parts like solid state batteries.

While Lamborghini is open to the idea of hybrids, the firm has no intention of building a fully electric model – at least given current technology. “This is mainly related to performance, handling, max speed and some other parameters… At the moment, we don’t see technology to allow us to say this is feasible," Reggiani told CarAdvice.

The first hybrid Lamborghini to arrive on sale will be in the Urus in 2019. The PHEV variant will reportedly borrow the powertrain from the Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid with a 4.0-liter biturbo V8 and electric motor producing 680 horsepower (507 kilowatts) and 626 pound-feet (850 Newton-meters). A 14.1-kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery allows for a 31-mile (50-kilometer) electric range in the sedan.

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Source: CarAdvice, 2

Gallery: Lamborghini Huracan Performante Spyder at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show