The 901 looks like it just rolled off the assembly line.

It’s surprising how often great relics of automotive history are unknowingly shoved in barns and garages around the world only to be forgotten until someone is lucky enough to stumble across the find. Even automakers have let prized vehicles just disappear, failing to keep an example tucked away to show the public later. Porsche is no different. For the first time, the German automaker will display a Porsche 901, one of the first 911s ever built by the company.

This is one of the few 901s ever built. There was a trademark dispute over the nameplate when Porsche introduced the car, forcing the automaker to change the 901 name to the iconic 911 we know today. The example on display at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany, has the chassis number 300.057. The video captured with the car on display gives an up-close look at all the 901’s amazing details.

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The 901’s journey from a barn-find to museum showpiece took several years. A TV crew discovered the 901 back in 2014, immediately contacting the Porsche museum. Porsche used genuine parts to bring the car back to showroom quality. The automaker repaired the engine, transmission, and interior to original factory spec – and it looks gorgeous. It should look great after taking nearly three years to restore.

The video from DrGumoLunatic not only shows the car, but also the entire exhibit Porsche put together for the car. It’s called "911 (901 No. 57) – A Legend Takes Off." According to a placard at the exhibit, the 901 rolled off the assembly line on October 22, 1964. The entire display is fascinating to see.

The Porsche 901 will be on display at Porsche Museum in Stuttgart until April 8, 2018. After that, it looks like Porsche may take the 901 racing. Another placard at the exhibit says the automaker will enter the car in historic rallies this year. If you don’t get a chance to see the 901 in Germany, maybe you’ll see it on the track.

Source: DrGumoLunatic via YouTube

Porsche 911 (901 No. 57)