Put a professional drifter on a closed California road and good things will happen.

Matt Field may not have a monstrous all-wheel drive Ford Mustang with a NASCAR engine, but he does have a Nissan 240sx with a 7.0-liter LSX V8 shoehorned between the fenders. He also holds a drift license and has numerous event wins, not to mention a second-place overall finish in last year’s Formula Drift World Championship.

 

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That’s good, because the GM V8 in his Nissan revs to 7,500 rpm and makes over 1,000 horsepower, which would be a handful on the widest race track, never mind the twisty mountain back roads of California. That’s right folks, it’s touge time so if you haven’t yet watched the video above, do so now.

Field’s car is officially the Falken Tire, Vapetasia, ARK Performance Nissan 240sx, so we’ll just simply call it a proper tire slayer. According to the Formula Drift website he’s currently ranked 11th in the series, though last year he scored three event wins at Texas, Irwindale, and Long Beach. Field clearly has some skill, and by that we mean far greater opposite-lock chops than any Motor1 staffer could conjure in our wildest stories.

 

Nissan 240sx drifting
Nissan 240sx drifting
Nissan 240sx drifting

 

Our favorite moment comes around the two-minute mark – not because he passes a perturbed cyclist, but because we get a good look at the California scenery. Scenery, we might add, which is not always blocked by guardrails. Such is the touge life, but the video description promises this was all done on a closed stretch of road, so no worries about the cyclist or anyone else actually being in harm’s way. Of course, none of that would've helped Field if he'd sailed off one of those corners.

We know there are Nissan purists out there throwing a fit over the LS-swap in an S14 240sx, but there’s no denying the spine-tingling sound that V8 makes at 7,500 revs. Aside from the V8 wail, this video offers up plenty of respect to the origins of professional drifting so many years ago on the mountain passes in Japan. With so many gymkhana-style videos all over YouTube these days, it’s nice to be reminded of where it all came from.

Source: HeatWaveVisual via YouTube

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