Is this the best road in the world? We vote yes.

Do you remember when Top Gear described the Transfagarasan mountain pass in Romania as the best road in the world? Well, that’s a statement we’ve heard from the Clarkson, May, and Hammond trio for several other roads around the globe, including the Stelvio pass in northern Italy, but we are tempted to agree the southern section of the Carpathian Mountains is where arguably the best public road is located.

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Given that, it’s no surprise Lamborghini has decided to take six Huracans to challenge the steep hairpin turns and switchbacks of Transfagarasan. The Italian manufacturer took all-wheel and rear-wheel drive version of the Coupe and Spyder, as well as the super impressive, record-braking Huracan Performante.

If you are unfamiliar with the Romanian pass, it’s open only for about three months each year, between July and September, and was built between 1970 and 1974. Ordered by former dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, the road was made to allow Romanian troops to cross the Carpathian Mountains quickly in the event of a Soviet invasion.


Lamborghini explains the convoy of six Huracans “departed from the city of Sibiu, passed through the village of Cartisoara, and then twisted and turned rapidly on the numerous hairpin turns that cut through the Fagaras Mountains.” The highest point of their trip was the Lake Balea at an altitude of 2,042 meters (6,699 ft), from where the group descended towards the impressive Vidraru dam.

As a final note, just for your viewing pleasure, we’ve also attached several videos of other great cars around the pass. Enjoy!

 

 


Source: 
Lamborghini

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Lamborghini Huracans around the Transfagarasan pass

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Sant’Agata Bolognese, 20 July 2017 – Six Lamborghini Huracán (All- and Rear-wheel-drive Coupés and Spyders), including the latest Performante, challenged the steep hairpin turns and switchbacks of one of the most spectacular and demanding roads in the world, the Transfăgărășan.
The Transfăgărășan passes through the land of Dracula in the Transylvania region of Romania, winding for 90 km. Open only from July to September, the road was built between 1970 and 1974 by order of dictator Nicolae Ceauşescu – it is also called Ceauşescu’s Folly – to allow Romanian troops to cross the Carpathian Mountains quickly in the event of a Soviet invasion.
The route climbs through the highest mountains of Romania, providing breathtaking views and rapid changes of landscape, passing from arid lands to verdant valleys.
The convoy departed from the city of Sibiu, passed through the village of Cartisoara and then twisted and turned rapidly on the numerous hairpin turns that cut through the Fagaras Mountains. The group of Lamborghinis then arrived at the highest point at Lake Balea and finally descended towards the impressive Vidraru dam, above which rise the ruins of the castle of Vlad III of Wallachia, who was the inspiration for author Bram Stoker’s Count Dracula character.