We'll take two, please.

There's a curious bond between car enthusiasts and Legos that can't be explained. The passion for drifting, however, is as obvious as a hot dog at a baseball game. Combing the two results in one of those why didn’t I think of that moments, and that's where Attika comes in. This YouTuber has a fondness for Lego Technics and a knack for custom builds that don’t just look good sitting on a shelf. Add in some ingenuity, a couple electric motors, a lightweight LiPo battery, and well, you see where this is going. But there’s a bit more to it than just snapping together some bricks and adding power.

 

More cool Lego projects:

 

Attika’s Audi-inspired Lego drift machine tips the scales at just 1.6 pounds, which is crazy impressive considering it’s a full-on radio control machine. Sticking true to Audi, this Lego longroof has full-time four-wheel drive to better control the drifting action, using two electric motors to turn the axles. It’s also wired up for low and high-beam LED headlights in front and tail lights out back, complete with brake lights. Why would a Lego RC creation need brake lights you ask? Because Attika built a functioning brake for the rear axle. After all, what kind of drift car would this be without a hand brake?

This creation does feature a few non-Lego parts, the obvious being the wheels and tires which are pulled straight from the 1/10 scale radio control cars. It also sports a few plastic bits created on a 3D printer, such as custom steering links and U-joints. The rubber tires are wrapped in tape to reduce traction while still giving the car a bit of bite for acceleration and steering.

The results speak for themselves. Attika explains the method behind the madness on the eurobricks forum – finding the right combination of grip, handling, and control was a fairly lengthy process but it’s more or less paid off. The wagon doesn’t sail around the floor with crazy levels of opposite lock, but it certainly spends much of the time in some measure of drift and if we’re honest, it looks like crazy fun.

Our advice to Attika: don’t crash it. We’ve seen what happens to Legos when they crash and it’s not pretty.

Source:  Attika via YouTube, eurobricks

Be part of something big