From Alpine to McLaren, here's a look back at some of the most eye-catching numbers from the Geneva Motor Show.

Numbers are all around us – whether we're breaking down the performance of a Ferrari 488, or comparing the price of a Model S to a Mercedes. Every week we pick out a few numbers that are so significant we have to give them a second look. Today we’re looking at key figures from Ford, Aston Martin, Alpine, and others following the 2017 Geneva Motor Show.

6:30

2017 SCG 003S

The amount of time Cameron Glickenhaus thinks it would take for his new SCG 003S supercar to lap the Nurburgring. With an 800-horsepower (596-kilowatt) V8, a curb weight of less than 3,000 pounds (1,360 kilograms), and a top speed of 217 miles per hour (349 kilometers per hour), I wouldn't bet against it.

5

2019 Aston Martin Valkyrie

The number of things you absolutely need to know about the new Aston Martin Valkyrie hypercar. Details like the Cosworth-built V12 engine, the limited run of just 175 models – oh, and the fact that it will have more than 850 horsepower (633 kilowatts) when it does go on sale sometime in the next year.

 

2,381

2017 - Alpine A110 Live Genève

The weight in pounds of the new Alpine A110 (or 1,080 kilograms). The lightweight sports car made its debut in Geneva, and comes with a 1.8-liter turbocharged engine and 252 horsepower (187 kilowatts) to go along with it. Too bad we won't get it in the U.S.

6

Ford Gulf Mirage GR802

The amount of stunning classic performance cars that Ford had on display in Geneva. The 1999 Focus RS Rally, the legendary Escort Cosworth RS, the quirky Escort Mexico, the iconic GT40, and a few others, of course. Hit the link for a full photo gallery of these beautiful legends.

2.8

McLaren 720S: Geneva 2017

The time in seconds it takes the new McLaren 720S to hit 60 miles per hour (96 kilometers per hour). That makes it just a bit quicker than the outgoing 650S and 675LT, and it’s all thanks to a new 4.0-liter biturbo V8 good for 710 horsepower (529 kilowatts) and a top speed of 212 miles per hour (341 kilometers per hour).

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