McLaren built just two examples of these special F1s with an LM-spec 680-hp engine and high-downforce body kit.

McLaren continues its amazing dig into the F1 history by interviewing someone who owns a very rare variant of the supercar. The British brand built just two of them with the Extra High Downforce Package (HDF) and the 680-horsepower (507-kilowatt) V12 from the LM-spec model. Andrew Bagnall has owned his exceptional example for about 10 years and has promised not to let it leave his collection.

McLaren F1 HDF


The Extra High Downforce Package on the F1 tweaked the body with a fixed rear wing, larger front splitter, and added louvers to the front clamshell. It also rides on larger wheels and a tweaked suspension setup. “They make a difference to the way the car handles,” Bagnall said about the changes. “You really notice the extra downforce when you’re driving at speed on a circuit.”

The modified engine uses parts from the F1 GTR race car, including upgraded cams and pistons. The result is more power than stock and an extra 1,000 revs to play with before hitting the redline. Larger radiators keep it cool, and an updated exhaust makes the mill sound mean. “The modifications have turned it from a comfortable, easy road-going car to a very taut quasi-racing machine for the road,” Bagnall said.

McLaren F1 HDF

Despite its rarity, Bagnall doesn’t let his F1 HDF be a complete garage queen. He says that the supercar sees the road about once a month, including occasional outings on the track.

While you might wish this F1 HDF could see the street more than about a dozen times a year, it’s easy to understand why Bagnall might be leery about driving the supercar. The other F1 HDF went up for auction during Monterey Car Week in 2015 and sold for an astounding $13.75 million. A decade ago when Bagnall took ownership, even the rare F1 was probably worth half that amount or possibly even less.

McLaren also recently looked back on how the F1 set its record-breaking (for the time) top speed of 240.1 miles per hour (386.7 kilometers per hour). It’s still an amazing feat for a naturally aspirated supercar.

For less than a tenth of a percent of a real F1 LM's price you can own Amalgam's 1:8 scale version of the supercar. Granted, the ultra-detailed replica still costs $10,160.  

Source: McLaren, RM Sothebys

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