From the Ford GT to the Audi R8, take a look back at some of the most eye-catching numbers of the week.

Numbers are all around us – whether we're breaking down the performance of a Ferrari 488, or comparing the price of a Model S to a Mercedes. Every week we pick out a few numbers that are so significant we have to give them a second look. Today we’re looking at key figures from Ford, Nissan, and Audi.

216

Ford GT

Top speed, in miles per hour, of the Ford GT. After teasing the car time and time again, Ford finally revealed some hard numbers. The GT’s 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 will put out 647 horsepower and 550 pound-feet of torque, and weighs just 3,054 pounds, enabling that incredible top speed.

9

2011 Nissan Esflow concept

Time, in months, until we’ll see a concept for the next Nissan Z sports car. That’s according to a new report that suggests a Nissan concept, possibly taking inspiration from the 2011 Esflow concept seen here, will debut in October at the Tokyo Motor Show.

7,370,000

1963 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight Auction

Cost, in dollars, of a 1963 Jaguar E-Type Lightweight. It sold at a recent Bonhams auction in Arizona, making it the most expensive car to cross the auction block there. That also makes it the most expensive E-Type to ever be sold; its value is due in large part to its rarity, as its one of only 12 surviving examples of the Lightweight models.

175,100

2017 Audi R8 V10 Spyder

The starting price, in dollars, of the 2017 Audi R8 V10 Spyder in the U.S. That sticker price gives buyers a very pretty supercar with a 5.2-liter V10 engine packing 540 hp, allowing it to rush to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds and on to an impressive 198 mph. The car goes on sale in the next few weeks’ time.

2

Euro-spec Ford Mustang in Euro NCAP crash test

The number of stars, out of five, that the Ford Mustang received in European NCAP crash testing. The testing agency said the car lacked some important safety features, including seatbelt load limiters, and that the frontal airbags didn’t inflate sufficiently in the frontal-offset test.

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