The Venturi Buckeye Bullet-3 is now the quickest EV in the world after managing an average top speed of 341.4 mph (549.43 kph).

The third generation of the VBB was finished in the first half of 2013 with the aim to perform a record-breaking attempt in September of the same year. However, the high-speed run had to be cancelled because of the bad weather in Utah that also prevented any attempts in 2014 and 2015. Things took a turn for the better last week when the VBB-3 was able to unleash its immense electric power on the Bonneville Salt Flats.

The Venturi VBB-3 managed to achieve an impressive average speed of 341.4 mph (549.43 kph) during its two 11-mile runs in both directions held at one-hour intervals as per the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile requirements. In one of the blazing fast sprints, the EV managed to hit an impressive top speed of 358 mph (576 kph), thus setting another FIA world speed record.


Roger Schroer was behind the wheel of the 3,000-horsepower EV machine developed by Venturi in collaboration with engineering students from Ohio State University. The most powerful electric car in the world is motivated by two Venturi-developed electric motors powered by 2MW batteries from A123 Systems sending the immense output to the road via a pair of two-speed Hewland gearboxes. The lithium iron phosphate batteries alone weigh a whopping 1.6 tons (3,200 pounds), while the vehicle itself tips the scales at around 3.5 tons (7,000 lbs).

Both records are now waiting for FIA’s stamp of approval, and Schroer believes there is still room for improvements. They might not be able to hit the magical 400-mph (644 kph) mark in the near future, but making some changes such as raising the shifting point to 10,200 rpm would increase maximum velocity and get closer to the impressive threshold. The weather conditions were not entirely perfect during last week’s runs, so a smoother salt surface could also help further improve the record. After all, Venturi estimates the VBB-3 can reach a jaw-dropping 440 mph (708 kph).


Be part of something big