Chevrolet 210

The Two-Ten series, introduced for the 1953 model year, replaced the Styleline DeLuxe series. It was actually the best-selling Chevrolet model during 1953 and 54, offering a balance of style and luxury appointments unavailable in the base 150 series, but was less costly than the glitzy Bel Air. Two-Tens offered the widest choice of body styles for 1953, including a convertible, Sport Coupe hardtop, two- and four-door sedans, and four-door station wagons.

1954 Chevrolet 2103 4-Door Sedan
As the American public began to prefer posh to economy, the Bel Air began to outsell the lesser series, including both 150 and 210 models. As a partial answer to this, Chevrolet re-introduced the Two-Ten Sport Coupe hardtop in the middle of the 1955 model year, and also added a four-door Two-Ten hardtop Sport Sedan for 1956. Neither achieved the sales of their Bel Air counterparts, however, since they were only about $100.00 cheaper than the Bel Airs, which provided more luxury and premium exterior trim.

Unlike the 150 series, Two-Tens were always available with the same luxury options as the Bel Air, including the Powerglide automatic transmission, power window lifts and seat adjuster. The Two-Ten Townsman was the top station wagon model offered in 1953, but the Townsman was moved up to the Bel Air series for 1954, only to return to the Two-Ten for 1955. The lower-priced Handyman station wagon, a four-door model in 1953-54, became a two-door for 1955-57. Both were joined by a nine-passenger Beauville four-door wagon in 1956-57.

Source: Wikipedia, 2015; Mecum Auctions as part of the Kansas City event in December, 2014

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