Ford XA Falcon GT

Third Generation Ford Falcon (1972-79)

Ford XA Falcon

The end of production of the Falcon in the US paved the way for much greater Australian input in the design of Australian-made Falcons, from 1972 onwards, although for several years there was still a distinct resemblance to the US-made Mustang. The XA Falcon, introducing a new hardtop coupe model, burst onto the scene with its distinctive range of paint colours, with purple and wild plum being popular, often ordered with white or black upholstery. The XA Falcon Hardtop bore a strong resemblance to the 1970-71 Ford Torino, and shared its "frameless window" doors with the utility and panel van variants. The drivetrains carried over from the XY, although the 250-2V was soon dropped, and the 'full-house' GT-HO engines no longer required due to changes in production racing regulations. Ford had planned a 'Phase IV' GT-HO (and built four), but cancelled it in the wake of the so-called 'Supercar Superscare'.

The GT variant kept the twin driving lights but reverted to a bonnet blackout with no strips at all on the vehicle. The front guards received fake 'vents' just behind the indicators, and NACA ducts were added to the bonnet. Steel '12-slot- wheels were re-introduced although some GTs received the 5-spoke Globe 'Bathurst' wheels, which had been ordered for the GT-HO Phase IV and now needed to be utilised. The GT's rear suspension featured radius rods to help locate the elliptical spring solid rear axle. Other performance parts from the aborted Phase IV found their way onto GTs, including larger fuel tanks and winged sumps. These specced up GTs are generally referred to as 'RPO83's after the option code covering the additional parts, although what parts any given RPO83 received seems to have been governed by the luck of the draw rather than any specific process.

From the rear, XA hardtops can be distinguished from later models by the tail lights, which have lenses which slope inwards (towards the front of the vehicle).

Source: Wikipedia, 2012

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