Lancia Aurelia B24S Convertible Pininfarina

Lancia’s development of the Aurelia GT, itself a derivation of the B10 Aurelia saloon that débuted in 1950, continued at the Brussels Motor Show of January 1955. The official début was of an arresting wraparound-windscreen spider, designated the B24. The competition successes of the Aurelia GT in the early-1950s had encouraged Lancia to offer increasingly sporting body styles for customers, and renowned U.S. importer Max Hoffman pitched numerous European manufacturers on embracing the potential of the American marketplace for dual-purpose open-top sports cars. Accordingly, between December 1954 and October 1955, Pinin Farina bodied 240 examples of the dynamic B24 spider on the fourth-series Aurelia GT chassis, the latter 181 of which were classified as B24S.

In July 1956, Lancia began offering a revised version of the B24S built on the fifth-series Aurelia GT platform, which featured modified camshafts, non-detachable cylinder liners, a new clutch, and direct drive top gear. The new car also featured revised bodywork and a true convertible top and roll-up windows for proper weather sealing, as well as redesigned seats for improved overall driver comfort. Officially dubbed the Aurelia GT 2500 America Convertible, only 150 examples of the new B24S were produced before a final revision was enacted in 1957 on the sixth-series Aurelia GT chassis. Following this final iteration, the model line was discontinued entirely, at which point just 521 examples of the B24S convertible had been produced.

An extremely early example of the new convertible body constructed on the fifth-series Aurelia GT chassis, 1185 is just the fourth car produced. It is, furthermore, highly unique in its livery of champagne with green leather interior and champagne carpets, believed to be the only example finished in this handsome colour combination. Optioned with a rare hardtop, this B24S convertible spent the majority of its life in northern Italy, principally Tuscany and Sienna. More recently, the car was acquired by an executive of Riso Scotti, the renowned Lombardy-based rice producer. Approximately 10 years ago, this owner commissioned a sympathetic repaint and cosmetic restoration in the rare original colours.

118 bhp, 2,451 cc overhead cam V-6 engine, dual twin-choke Weber 40 DCL5 carburettors, four-speed manual rear-mounted transaxle, front independent sliding-pillar suspension, rear de Dion axle with leaf springs and shock absorbers, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.

Photo Credit: Tim Scott
Source: RM Auctions

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