Oldsmobile Toronado Brougham

The Oldsmobile Toronado was a two-door coupe produced by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors from 1966 to 1992.

The name "Toronado" has no meaning, and was originally invented for a 1963 Chevrolet show car. Conceived as Oldsmobile's full-size personal luxury car and competing directly with the Ford Thunderbird, the Toronado is historically significant as the first front-wheel drive automobile produced in the United States since the demise of the Cord in 1937.

The Toronado was structurally related to the 1966 rear-wheel-drive Buick Riviera and the following year's Cadillac Eldorado, although each had quite different styling. The Toronado continued to share its E-body platform with the Riviera and Eldorado for most of its 28-year history.

Also for 1977, the 455 cu in (7.5 L) V8 was replaced by a smaller 403 cu in (6.6 L) engine, due mainly to forthcoming government Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards (implemented beginning with the 1978 model year). In addition, the '77 Delta 88 and Ninety-Eight models, formerly the biggest cars in the Oldsmobile stable, were downsized. For two more model years, the
The Oldsmobile Toronado was a two-door coupe produced by the Oldsmobile division of General Motors from 1966 to 1992.

Toronado would be the largest Oldsmobile, and, after the mid-sized Cutlass line's downsizing for '78, the Toronado looked hopelessly out of place in the Olds lineup, given the industry-wide shift to smaller cars.

This generation was probably helped in the sales race by the radical and controversial "boat-tail" (image) design of the contemporary Buick Riviera, since during this period the Toronado outsold its Buick cousin for the first time. However, the higher-priced Cadillac Eldorado managed, in turn, to outsell the Toronado in most of these years.

Source: Wikipedia, 2012


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