Packard Super Eight 7-Passenger Phaeton

For 1936 the Super 8 series encompassed the 1403, 1404 and 1405 with wheelbases ranging from just 132 inches on the 1403 to an impressive 144 inches on the 1405, which was the same as that used for the Twelve. The Super 8 was given the new sloped grille with chrome vertical bars that were actually thermostatically controlled shutters, which would remain closed while the engine was warming up and open automatically for proper ventilation. The fender styling was altered slightly as were the hood vents and headlamp trim.

Packard maintained a close relationship with Dietrich, Inc. and for good reason; the Dietrich designs were important sources of fresh ideas and concepts for Packard’s own coachwork, and the association with Dietrich and its founder enhanced the appeal of the Packard. Ray Dietrich was a designer at Brewster and was unexpectedly fired along with another colleague, Tom Hibbard, when the management learned of the pair’s plans to set up their own shop. Not wanting to remain out on the street, they set up shop in New York City and opened LeBaron Carrossiers. Although the firm was on the rise, Hibbard left in 1923 to pair up with a designer he met in Paris by the name of Howard Darrin, and Dietrich later moved to Detroit to form a subsidiary of Murray. There was an immediate financial falling out over the use of seed money provided by Edsel Ford, and in September 1930 Dietrich was forced out of his namesake firm over a disagreement as to what action should be taken to survive the Depression. Although Ray Dietrich was gone, his talent was manifest in the many custom and semi-custom bodies that continued to bear his name and grace Packards for years to come.

This car was auctioned off by RM Auctions in October of 2011 at the Hershey Lodge, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

150 bhp, 384.4 cu. in. L-head eight, three-speed manual selective synchromesh transmission, semi-elliptic leaf spring suspension front and rear, four-wheel mechanical brakes. Wheelbase: 144"

Source: RM Auctions

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