Bugatti Type 57 Grand Raid Roadster

Built between 1934 and 1939, the Type 57 was Bugatti’s swan song. It was developed by Jean Bugatti, and it simplified the Miller DOHC drive train that had been appropriated for the Types 50, 51 and 55, substituting a chain of gears at the rear of the engine to drive the camshafts.

The car would, generally speaking, be bought in two series with four variations: T57, T57C (with compressor), T57S (short, low-slung chassis) and T57SC (same thing with blower). There were four “standard” body styles available for each chassis, in theory at least. They were Galibier (four-door sedan), Ventoux (two-door, four-seat coupe), Stelvio (two-door, four-seat cabriolet), Atalante (two-door, two-seat coupe) and Aravis (two-door, two-seat cabriolet).

This, however, does not account for the various special T57s, including the numerous coachbuilders across Europe who created one-offs. It also does not account for the Grand Raid roadster, which was essentially a prototype that preceded the famous 57S. The offering of such a car is not only incredibly rare but tremendously important.

This car was auctioned off by RM Auctions in August of 2011 at the Portola Hotel & Spa and Monterey Conference Center, Monterey, California.

135 hp, 3,257 cc DOHC straight eight, Zenith carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, front semi-elliptic springs, rear quarter-elliptic inverted springs, live axle, four-wheel mechanical brakes. Wheelbase: 130"

Source: RM Auctions
Photo Credit: Copyright

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