Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Coupe

At the 1968 Paris Salon, Ferrari introduced what many considered a fantastic tour de force, the 365 GTB 4. Never officially called “Daytona”, the car remains notable as the last road going front-engine model designed before Fiat essentially took over the production side of Ferrari in 1969. Externally, the new 365 GTB 4 benefited from yet another timeless Pininfarina body design, executed by Scaglietti. Power was provided by the Colombo-derived Tipo 251 V-12 engine, which displaced 4.4 litres and featured four overhead camshafts and six Weber twin-choke carburettors. Output stood at about 350 brake horsepower, sufficient for remarkable zero-to-100 km/h times of just 5.9 seconds and a reported top speed of 280 km/h (174 mph). Road & Track testers independently confirmed its breathtaking performance, and without doubt, the Ferrari 365 GTB 4 distinguished itself as the world’s fastest production car.

Although the Daytona was initially conceived as an interim model for the long-awaited 365 GT 4 Berlinetta Boxer, it was released as the fastest and, for legions of Ferrari enthusiasts, the most desirable car in the world. While Ferrari ultimately conformed with the rising trend of mid-engine “supercars” with the Berlinetta Boxer and Testarossa, the classic Ferrari formula of a front-mounted V-12 continues to show its appeal in Ferrari’s current road models. Four decades after its début, however, the 365 GTB 4 Daytona maintains its glorious status among the sports car elite and is a cultural icon in its own right.

Part of the RM Auctions event at Ferrari S.p.A in May, 2009; at the Battersea Evolution in October, 2009; at the the Grimaldi Forum in May, 2010 and London, October, 2012.

352 bhp, 4,390 cc double overhead camshaft V-12 engine, six Weber 40DCN20 dual-choke carburettors, five-speed manual gearbox, independent front and rear suspension with unequal-length A-arms, coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5 in.)

Source: RM Auctions
Photo Credit: Copyright Pieter E. Kamp, Tom Wood and Tom Scott

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